Wilson Center Press Books on Asian History Make Library Journal Bestseller List

Oct 01, 2004

India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know
Edited by Francine R. Frankel and Harry Harding
Copub.: Columbia University Press

As we move further into a new century, the two most populous nations on earth, India and China, continue a long and tangled relationship. Given their contested border, their nuclear rivalry, their competition for influence in Asia, their growing economic relations, and their internal problems, interaction between these two powers will deeply affect not only stability and prosperity in the region, but also vital U.S. interests. Yet the dynamics of the Chinese-Indian relationship are little known to Americans.

This volume brings together scholars from political science, history, economics, international relations, and security studies to add depth to our understanding of India-China relations. Throughout, the contributors address three common questions: what are the similarities and differences between the two countries' strategic cultures, domestic circumstances, and international environments? What are the broader international contexts for their bilateral relations? And what parallels and tensions exist between their national interests? U.S. policymakers, the academic community, and the informed public require fresh thinking and greater attention to India-China relations, as both countries promise to be of strategic importance to the United States in the decades ahead.

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Frontier Passages: Ethnopolitics and the Rise of Chinese Communism, 1921-1945
Written by Xiaoyuan Liu
Copub.: Stanford University Press

In this pathbreaking book, Xiaoyuan Liu establishes the ways in which the history of the Chinese Communist Party was, from the Yan'an period onward, intertwined with the ethnopolitics of the Chinese "periphery." As a Han-dominated party, the CCP had to adapt to an inhospitable political environment, particularly among the Hui (Muslims) of northwest China and the Mongols of Inner Mongolia. Based on a careful examination of CCP and Soviet Comintern documents only recently available, Liu's study shows why the CCP found itself unable to follow the Russian Bolshevik precedent of inciting separatism among the non-Han peoples as a stratagem for gaining national power. Rather than swallowing Marxist-Leninist dogma on "the nationalities question," the CCP took a position closer to that of the Kuomintang, stressing the inclusiveness of the Han-dominated Chinese nation, "Zhonghua Minzu."

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The Library Journal Bestsellers are lists produced by YBP and distributed weekly by the Library Journal Academic News Wire. The lists consist of titles profiled six months prior to list publication.

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