4th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Photo by Mona Youssef

Opposition Strategies in Egypt

April 26, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:00pm
Amr Hamzawy discusses opposition strategies in Egypt and how they can contribute to the democratization process.

Quo Vadis? Recruitment and Contracting of Migrant Workers and their Access to Social Security

April 17, 2013 // 9:00am — 11:00am
The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and Latin American Program and the Institute for Studies and Communication on Migration (Instituto de Estudios y Divulgación sobre Migración, INEDIM) were pleased to host a presentation of the following study: Quo Vadis? Recruitment and Contracting of Migrant Workers and their Access to Social Security: The Dynamics of Temporary Labor Migration Systems in North and Central America.

Historical Perspective on the Arab Spring

April 08, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
In the Middle East, a parallel pattern can be seen in the history of the first Middle Eastern constitutional revolutions in the political movements of the 1870s. What does an examination of the role of constitutionalism in the Arab revolutions of 1923-2011 reveal about prospects for constitutional governments in the Middle East?

Information Session: First Agreement Between Serbia and Kosovo of Principles Governing Normalization of Relations

April 24, 2013 // 10:00am — 11:30am
On 19 April 2013, in Brussels, under the auspices of the European Union and EU foreign policy chief Baroness Catherine Ashton, the leaders of Serbia and Kosovo signed “The First Agreement of Principles governing Normalization of Relations.” While there is opposition in both Serbia and Kosovo to the Agreement, it has since been approved by both the parliaments in Belgrade and Prishtina. This information session explores the background to the Agreement and its political implications.

A Muslim Tale of Two Cities: ‘We Met the Trains’

April 10, 2013 // 2:30pm — 3:30pm
The forced migration of Muslims from the Balkans to Turkey is one of the least known movements of people in modern times. In "A Muslim Tale of Two Cities" Frances Trix focuses on urban Muslims from the central Balkans and the hometown associations they founded in Turkish cities.

Stalin’s Decision for War in Korea

March 18, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
At the end of the 1940s Joseph Stalin was forced to negotiate a new treaty of alliance with the victorious Chinese Communists. Mao Zedong won significant concessions from Stalin. The Soviet dictator was compelled to alter completely his policy for Korea.

A Muslim Weimar? Istanbul between the Wars

March 04, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
One reading of modern Turkish history focuses on the country's perpetual race to catch up with Europe. In the often forgotten world of interwar Istanbul, Muslims were the powerful hosts and Europeans the unwanted migrants.

China’s Climate Change Challenge

March 13, 2013 // 9:00am — 10:30am
NOTE: We are no longer accepting RSVPs for this event. Seating will be on a first come-first serve basis, so please arrive early to ensure seating.

The Arab Revolution

February 25, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Arab academics and activists call the uprisings that started in early 2011 across the Arab world “revolutions.” Yet the “Arab Revolution” is both similar and dissimilar to the French, Russian, and other great revolutions that molded the history of the Western world, as described by Crane Brinton in his classic, The Anatomy of Revolution.

From Challengers to Partners? Relations Between Human Rights NGOs and their Home Governments from the 1970s on

January 30, 2013 // 12:00pm — 12:45pm
The concept of human rights acquired global significance during the 1970s, spurred by the activities of a growing number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) responding to state repression in Chile, South Africa, the Warsaw Pact states, and elsewhere. Key interlocutors for NGOs like Amnesty International and Helsinki Watch were their home governments, whom they influenced through a combination of public campaigning and private lobbying. Crucially, it seems that during this period human rights NGOs experienced a trajectory from ‘outsider’ to ‘insider’ status. Does this mean that they paid a costly price for their newfound influence, namely abandoning their original ‘apolitical’ appeal and becoming less impartial and independent? Or should we understand this to be their success in transforming the character of international politics?

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