4th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Is American History "Exceptional?" A Global Perspective

December 05, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Following World War II, the dominant narrative of U.S. history posited "American exceptionalism." That assumption shaped historical scholarship and Cold War policy. More recently a neo-conservative belief in exceptionalism has affected international and domestic history. A global perspective reveals that our history is not "exceptional," only distinctive. Every major moment in American history--Revolution, Civil War, Progressivism, and the New Deal, for example--is part of a larger transnational history.

Black Leaders and Leadership

November 21, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
“Black Leaders and Leadership” is a presentation based on the ten-year oral history project co-directed by Julian Bond and Phyllis Leffler. It relates the views of fifty Black leaders on such topics as family, education, and the inspiration of the Civil Rights movement.

The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the South

November 07, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Organized in collaboration with the History and Public Policy Program and the National History Center.

Missed Opportunities for Peace? The United States, Jordan and the 1967 Arab-Israeli War

October 31, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Nigel Ashton from the London School of Economics hosts a seminar regarding US and Jordanian decision-making prior to the Six Day War in June 1967.

Statelessness in 20th-Century America

October 24, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Linda K. Kerber, May Brodbeck Professor of History at the University of Iowa will examine such developments in the context of the history of statelessness in the 20th century, focusing on the evolution of the sixty -year-old UN convention on refugees and stateless persons, a document the United States has not signed.

The Contested Legacy of the Berlin Wall

October 17, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Hope Harrison, Wilson Center public policy scholar speaks on the mixed legacy of the Berlin Wall in German consciousness and history, in regards to the recent efforts to preserve parts of the wall.

Why We Botch the Ends of Wars

October 03, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
A persistent theme in American history in wartime is a failure to plan carefully for the aftermath of wars. Obsessed with the military aspects of their struggles, neither military nor civilian leaders pay close attention to political issues until the shooting is about to stop, making the achievement of a durable settlement dramatically harder.

Dag Hammarskjold, His Critics, and the United Nations in 1956

September 26, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Wm. Roger Louis from the University of Texas discusses the extremely significant role of Dag Hammarskjold in the 1956 Suez Crisis, a pivotal point in UN history with an impact still felt in today's peacekeeping missions.

Humanitarian Response in a Time of Mass Collaboration and Networked Intelligence

October 04, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Gisli Olafsson, Emergency Response Director of NetHope, will discuss how digital age technologies, like social media, are revolutionizing the way humanitarian response will be conducted in the future.

From Vision to Reality: Politics and Gender in Jordan's Tourism Sector

September 23, 2011 // 9:00am — 10:00am
Dr. Abu-Ghazaleh will speak on the recent developments on the Arab Spring and her experience on challenges to mainstream gender in the tourism sector in Jordan.

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