4th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Documentary History of Greece: 1943-1951, Truman Doctrine and Marshall Plan

March 08, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Director of the Service of Diplomatic and Historical Archives of the Hellenic Ministry of Foreign Affairs Photini Tomai will discuss her latest book entitled “Documentary History of Greece: 1943-1951, Truman Doctrine and Marshall Plan." Along with the economic reconstruction of the country, it traces the political, social and military implications of the implementation of the economic recovery program extended throughout Greece especially after the Civil War.

Stalin and Togliatti: Italy and the Origins of the Cold War

March 28, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Elena Agarossi, professor of contemporary history at the Scuola Superiore di Pubblica Amministrazione in Rome and member of the Wilson Center European Alumni Association will lead a panel discussion on her latest book entitled Stalin and Togliatti: Italy and the Origins of the Cold War.

Stalin and the Turkish Crisis of the Cold War, 1945-1953

February 28, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Jamil Hasanli, former Wilson Center scholar and professor of history at Baku State University will discuss his latest book, "Stalin and the Turkish Crisis of the Cold War, 1945-1953." Hasanli will explore the ups and downs of Soviet-Turkish relations during and immediately after World War II.

The Death of Trilateralism in the NAFTA Neighborhood: Views from the United States, Mexico, and Canada

December 15, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Three panelists reviewed the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the evolution of regional economic cooperation.

Could the War in Vietnam Have Ended Earlier?

November 28, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The Vietnam War cost the lives of more than 58,000 Americans (and millions of Vietnamese) and convulsed U.S. politics and culture in the 1960s. Could it have ended years earlier, and with a far smaller toll?

Reassessing Walter Lippmann

November 14, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Professor of International Relations Ronald Steel speaks about the career and legacy of renowned journalist Walter Lippman.

Is American History "Exceptional?" A Global Perspective

December 05, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Following World War II, the dominant narrative of U.S. history posited "American exceptionalism." That assumption shaped historical scholarship and Cold War policy. More recently a neo-conservative belief in exceptionalism has affected international and domestic history. A global perspective reveals that our history is not "exceptional," only distinctive. Every major moment in American history--Revolution, Civil War, Progressivism, and the New Deal, for example--is part of a larger transnational history.

Black Leaders and Leadership

November 21, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
“Black Leaders and Leadership” is a presentation based on the ten-year oral history project co-directed by Julian Bond and Phyllis Leffler. It relates the views of fifty Black leaders on such topics as family, education, and the inspiration of the Civil Rights movement.

The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the South

November 07, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Organized in collaboration with the History and Public Policy Program and the National History Center.

Missed Opportunities for Peace? The United States, Jordan and the 1967 Arab-Israeli War

October 31, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Nigel Ashton from the London School of Economics hosts a seminar regarding US and Jordanian decision-making prior to the Six Day War in June 1967.

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