5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Whither Pakistan-U.S. Relations? Looking Toward the Afghan Endgame and 2014

April 10, 2012 // 11:00am — 12:30pm
Reluctant allies, Pakistan and the US grudgingly need each other to reach shared goals: keeping Al Qaeda out of Afghanistan and structuring an orderly withdrawal of NATO forces. Wilson Center expert Zahid Hussain offers ways to thaw what right now is a “frozen” relationship.

The Working Group on the Western Balkans: Setting an Agenda for Transatlantic Cooperation

November 29, 2011 // 10:00am — 3:00pm
The EU and the US agree that the long-term goal for the Western Balkans is European integration. For a variety of reasons, however, progress on this goal has stalled. This series aims at launching a discussion on the hurdles to enlargement in the Western Balkans, the tools available to various international actors in the region, and how these resources might best be applied to reach the goal of integration most efficiently. These meetings, therefore, address issues that are at the core of the making the Transatlantic relationship work.
Open Source Image. Created and copyright (2006) by Yeu Ninje.

Game Change in the Asia-Pacific: The South China Sea and TPP

March 27, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:15pm
China has recently been a major force in political games in the Asia-Pacific. For example, it has succeeded in partly disengaging the United States from the trade framework in Southeast Asia by promoting “low quality” Free Trade Agreements in the region. China has also viewed the ASEAN Regional Forum and East Asia Summit as convenient non-binding and consensus-based arenas that allow Beijing to avoid dealing with hard issues such as maritime disputes in the South China Sea. The Obama administration’s much-discussed “Asia Pivot” is an attempt to reinsert the United States into regional political games and is perhaps most evident in the administration’s focus on the Trans-Pacific Partnership multilateral FTA. How is the United States’ reemergence as a regional player changing the existing components of the political game? What trade and strategic initiatives is Washington undertaking? How will other regional players, such as Japan and India, respond to American and Chinese moves?

Year of Decision: Obama, Netanyahu and Competing Strategies to Deal with Iran

March 23, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent of the New York Times, discusses the Iran nuclear challenge as an issue in U.S.-Israeli relations in the wake of Israel Prime Minister Netanyahu’s visit to Washington and President Obama’s important speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.

A Conversation on Climate Change with Brazilian Expert Luiz Gylvan Meira Filho

March 28, 2012 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
On Wednesday, March 28, the Brazil Institute invites Dr. Luiz Gylvan Meira Filho to discuss climate change.
Congress & the Politics of Trade

Congress & the Politics of Trade

March 19, 2012 // 4:00pm — 6:00pm
This panel will explore the intersection presidential and congressional politics as they play-out against the President’s trade agenda.

Regional Security Complex Theory and Turkish Foreign Policy: NATO Missile Shield, Eurasian Energy Politics and the Arab Spring

May 03, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Turkish foreign policy is coming under increasing scrutiny since the election of the ruling Justice and Development Party in 2002. Critiques state that Turkish foreign policy is becoming 'neo-Ottoman' or 'Islamist', arguing that Turkey is moving closer to the Middle East than Europe. The underlying hypothesis of Hamid Akin Unver's lecture however, argues that Turkey's foreign policy is not becoming more Islamist; it is becoming more British, following a pattern of external affairs in which identity is becoming increasingly more pronounced. By focusing on three case studies: Turkey’s self-appointed role as an energy hub between Europe and Russia, its role in NATO and its recent installation of the missile defense shield, and finally, its changing stance against Iran and Syria following the Arab Spring, the lecture will discuss how identity (as it relates to the narratives of history and culture) shape Turkey’s foreign policy understanding and patterns of cooperation and conflict.

Macedonia and NATO: From Security Consumer to Security Provider

March 27, 2012 // 10:00am — 11:00am
Macedonia joined the Partnership for Peace in 1995, and in 1999 it adopted its first Action Plan for NATO Membership (MAP). On 5 December 2011, the International Court of Justice ruled in favor of Macedonia that Greece violated the Interim Accord by blocking the accession of Macedonia into NATO at the Bucharest Summit in 2008. Members of the Macedonian Foreign Policy Committee will discuss how their nation transitioned into a NATO security provider.

Return to China or "Return to Taiwan": The Chinese POWs Who Derailed the Korean War Peace Talks

March 22, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
David Cheng Chang, postdoctoral fellow at the Center for East Asian Studies at Stanford University will give a presentation based on his recent work entitled Return to China or “Return to Taiwan”: The Chinese POWs Who Derailed the Korean War Peace Talks.

The Mexican Elections and the Future of Social Democracy in Mexico

March 19, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
The Woodrow Wilson Center Mexico Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue hosted the latest installment in the ongoing series Dialogues with Mexico/Diálogos con México: “The Mexican Elections and the Future of Social Democracy in Mexico”, featuring Jesús Zambrano Grijalva. Mr. Zambrano is currently President of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, Mexico’s largest party of the left; he spoke on Mexico’s upcoming national election and the impact it will have on Mexican society.

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