5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Japan’s Middle East Policy since 9/11

July 25, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:15pm
Japan’s policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and, more broadly, on Middle East issues generally has been shaped by two key factors: Tokyo’s quest for oil, and its awareness of the wider international diplomatic and political setting. Unfortunately for Japan, these two considerations have frequently pushed Japanese policy makers in opposite directions. Historically, Japan has preferred a low-key approach to the region. But in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, Tokyo has faced increasing pressure to become more engaged--more specifically, to contribute to the U.S.-led war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Does Japan aspire to be a relevant player in the Middle East? Can it play such a role, if it wishes to do so? Wilson Center visiting scholar Yuka Uchida will discuss these and related issues as she explores the post-9/11 evolution of Japanese policy in the broader Middle East.

Latino Leadership Project: A Latino Perspective on U.S. Foreign Policy

July 23, 2012 // 9:30am — 11:00am
The Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute, together with the Pacific Council on International Policy, hosted a presentation on a Latino Perspective on U.S. Foreign Policy.

How to Build a 21st Century Border

July 16, 2012 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
As one of the architects of the 21st Century Border initiative, Alan Bersin, Assistant Secretary of International Affairs and Chief Diplomatic Officer for the Department of Homeland Security, delivered a keynote address at a discussion on developing efficient and secure border management strategies.

Urban Resilience in Situations of Chronic Violence

July 12, 2012 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
The relentless violence that besets many cities around the world prompts local responses in the neighborhoods and broader communities. Those responses can comprise what we call resilience. Elements of positive resilience can include an array of protective measures, some of which are organized by the communities alone, some with city or state officials, some with outside organizations like NGOs or development agencies.

United States-China Comparative Government Organization and Operation in Science & Technology Innovation

June 19, 2012 // 9:00am — 5:00pm
The Kissinger Institute on China and the United States, and The Counsellors’ Office of the State Council (COSC), People’s Republic of China, in collaboration with The Program on America and the Global Economy Present a Symposium on United States-China Comparative Government Organization and Operation in Science & Technology Innovation. Featuring Leaders from the Counsellors’ Office, PRC State Council and Prominent U. S. Academic and Public Sector Experts

Religion and Violence in Central America

July 11, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:00am
Violent crime in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala has reached unprecedented levels. It is frequently religious organizations that are on the front lines of efforts to reduce gang violence and get young people out of gangs.

OECD Economic Survey of the United States, 2012

June 26, 2012 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
The OECD’s 2012 Economic Survey of the United States is an in-depth analysis of the U.S. economy and offers policy recommendations to promote sustainable economic growth and employment. The Survey also explores policy options to reduce income inequality and poverty. A special chapter in this year’s report is focused on fostering innovation.

Multi-Track Diplomacy: Seen Through the Eyes of the Practitioner

June 28, 2012 // 9:15am — 12:30pm
On June 28th, the Leadership Project held a workshop on multi-track diplomacy with Yair Hirschfeld, lead negotiator for the Oslo Accords, and others. The workshop focused its attention on lessons learned and understanding how best to employ the tools of multi-track diplomacy.

Revolution and Rebirth: The View from Alexandria, Egypt

June 26, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Ismail Serageldin discusses how Egypt’s Bibliotheca Alexandrina (BA) saw the rebirth of an ancient institution of scholarship and learning. For eight years in Mubarak’s Egypt, the BA was a beacon for freedom and enlightenment, and helped promote the deep currents that fed Egypt’s revolution in the Arab Spring. Yet its own values and commitments were and are being put to the test as the Egyptian people challenge authority and take charge of their own destiny.

The Thirsty King: Digging into the Water Footprint of China’s Coal

July 24, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:00am
This discussion "digs" into the coal-water choke point in China, looking at how the country's continued reliance on coal will impact future water supplies, and how China's power sector will survive a predictably parched future.

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