5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Venezuela’s Primary Elections: What To Expect?

February 02, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:00am
On Sunday, February 12, 2012, Venezuela held a primary election aimed at defining a single candidate to oppose President Hugo Chávez in presidential elections scheduled for October 7. In a rare showing of unity, opposition parties have agreed to select a single candidate to challenge President Chávez in the October elections, hoping to end more than a decade of his control of the presidency.

Grand Domestic Revolution: Recovering the Forgotten History of Feminism and Housing Design

February 15, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Please join us for the fifth lecture in “The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History” lecture series, a joint venture between the The National Women’s History Museum (NWHM) and the Woodrow Wilson Center.

Trade and Agriculture: Trans-Pacific Perspectives

February 13, 2012 // 3:30pm — 5:30pm
Agriculture has often been a stumbling block in free trade negotiations. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), often seen as the economic component of the Obama Administration’s “Asia pivot,” is no exception. Can Japan’s leadership, which has indicated a willingness to join the TPP, surmount resistance from its domestic agricultural lobby? Is the TPP attractive to countries like Korea, which has enthusiastically negotiated separate bilateral free trade agreements, most notably with the United States? What are the problems and opportunities in the agreement for American agricultural producers? How do nations like New Zealand, an agricultural powerhouse and original member of the TPP, view the negotiating positions of potential new members to the agreement?

Sustainable Solutions for the Planet’s Energy Challenge

January 25, 2012 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
The environmental challenges of climate change, energy demands, and natural resource loss continue to mount. World population hit seven billion on Halloween and is projected to go to ten billion if not more. The first decade of the 21st century was the warmest in 130 years of recorded global temperatures and 2010 was the warmest year yet recorded. At the Wilson Center, experts will discuss energy solutions to meet with these increasingly demanding challenges.

An Assessment of Iran’s Upcoming Parliamentary Elections

February 09, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:15pm
Hosein Ghazian, an expert on the electoral process, presented a preview of the March 2 Iranian parliamentary elections.

Two Decades after El Salvador’s Peace Accords: Current Challenges

January 30, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:30am
In the twenty years since the signing of the Peace Accords, El Salvador has made impressive progress in expanding political and media freedoms, reforming the military and security forces, lowering rates of poverty and inequality, improving respect for human rights, and reforming electoral institutions. Today, however, El Salvador faces unprecedented security and economic challenges. An upsurge in transnational crime, including narcotics, weapons, and human trafficking, has intersected with longstanding problems of gang violence such that El Salvador suffers one of the highest homicide rates in the world. El Salvador’s economy continues to struggle amidst the global recession and weak economic recovery in the United States, the country’s largest export market.

How Cyber and Space Capabilities Affect Nuclear Weapons Policy

January 27, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
Michael Nacht, Professor of Public Policy, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, will discuss how cyber and space capabilities affect nuclear weapons policy.

Recent Developments in Nigeria: Subsidies, Spills and Security

January 30, 2012 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
Endowed with an abundance of natural resource wealth and perhaps the largest human resource potential on the African continent, Nigeria is also burdened by various challenges that threaten the country’s prospects for long-term development and stability. Ambassador Eunice Reddick, former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria Howard Jeter, and Shell Oil Corporate Communications Director Olav Ljosne discuss the country’s long-term challenges.

Dependent America? How Canada and Mexico Construct U.S. Power

February 21, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:00am
In Dependent America?, Stephen Clarkson and Matto Mildenberger explore the extent to which U.S. power is a function of its capacity to mobilize other states’ material and moral support. The authors presented the book, and discussants commented on it.

The Hungarian "Exception": Lessons in Political Economy

February 01, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Could Hungary's experience as a European Union member state be instructive? During the past decade the country's macroeconomic policies were characterized by sharp changes first under a socialist and later under a center-right government. George Kopits, Wilson Center Senior Scholar and former chair of Hungary's Fiscal Council, will assess the country's fiscal and monetary policies, as well as its overall economic performance and institution-building efforts against the backdrop of the deepening European financial crisis.

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