5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Regional Security Complex Theory and Turkish Foreign Policy: NATO Missile Shield, Eurasian Energy Politics and the Arab Spring

May 03, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Turkish foreign policy is coming under increasing scrutiny since the election of the ruling Justice and Development Party in 2002. Critiques state that Turkish foreign policy is becoming 'neo-Ottoman' or 'Islamist', arguing that Turkey is moving closer to the Middle East than Europe. The underlying hypothesis of Hamid Akin Unver's lecture however, argues that Turkey's foreign policy is not becoming more Islamist; it is becoming more British, following a pattern of external affairs in which identity is becoming increasingly more pronounced. By focusing on three case studies: Turkey’s self-appointed role as an energy hub between Europe and Russia, its role in NATO and its recent installation of the missile defense shield, and finally, its changing stance against Iran and Syria following the Arab Spring, the lecture will discuss how identity (as it relates to the narratives of history and culture) shape Turkey’s foreign policy understanding and patterns of cooperation and conflict.

Macedonia and NATO: From Security Consumer to Security Provider

March 27, 2012 // 10:00am — 11:00am
Macedonia joined the Partnership for Peace in 1995, and in 1999 it adopted its first Action Plan for NATO Membership (MAP). On 5 December 2011, the International Court of Justice ruled in favor of Macedonia that Greece violated the Interim Accord by blocking the accession of Macedonia into NATO at the Bucharest Summit in 2008. Members of the Macedonian Foreign Policy Committee will discuss how their nation transitioned into a NATO security provider.

Return to China or "Return to Taiwan": The Chinese POWs Who Derailed the Korean War Peace Talks

March 22, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
David Cheng Chang, postdoctoral fellow at the Center for East Asian Studies at Stanford University will give a presentation based on his recent work entitled Return to China or “Return to Taiwan”: The Chinese POWs Who Derailed the Korean War Peace Talks.

The Mexican Elections and the Future of Social Democracy in Mexico

March 19, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
The Woodrow Wilson Center Mexico Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue hosted the latest installment in the ongoing series Dialogues with Mexico/Diálogos con México: “The Mexican Elections and the Future of Social Democracy in Mexico”, featuring Jesús Zambrano Grijalva. Mr. Zambrano is currently President of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, Mexico’s largest party of the left; he spoke on Mexico’s upcoming national election and the impact it will have on Mexican society.

Moles, Defectors, and Deceptions: James Angleton and His Influence on US Counterintelligence

March 29, 2012 // 9:00am — 5:30pm
A Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and Georgetown University Center for Peace & Security Studies joint conference.

Two for One: A New Co-control Approach for Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China

March 14, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:00am
Please join us for an insightful conversation with two researchers, Hu Tao and Mao Xianqiang, who will discuss how these co-control methods serve MEP in implementing the current 12th Five-Year Plan targets and the new air quality standards and the understand the prospects of some on-the-ground pilot projects in cities and the power sector in China.

The Art of Synthetic Biology Governance: Considering the Concepts of Scientific Uncertainty and Cross-Borderness

March 27, 2012 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
Governments around the world are considering how to regulate synthetic biology in an effort to maximize the benefits of the emerging technology while minimizing the risks.
Photo Courtesy of United Nations Photo

Megacities, Global Security, and the Map of the Future

March 20, 2012 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
Peter H. Liotta, co-author of "The Real Population Bomb: Megacities, Global Security, and the Map of the Future," was joined by Jaana Remes (McKinsey Global Institute) and Peter Engelke (Stimson Center) to discuss the geopolitical impacts of poorly managed urbanization.

China and Coexistence: Beijing's National Security Strategy for the Twenty-First Century

March 12, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:15pm
"Peaceful coexistence," long a key phrase in China’s strategic thinking, is a constructive doctrine that offers China a path for influencing the international system. So argues Liselotte Odgaard in this timely analysis of China's national security strategy in the context of its foreign policy practice. China’s program of peaceful coexistence emphasizes absolute sovereignty and non-interference in the internal affairs of other states. Odgaard suggests that China’s policy of working within the international community and with non-state actors such as the UN aims to win for China greater power and influence without requiring widespread exercise of military or economic pressure.

St. Petersburg Regionalism as a Political Force: 1980s to 2010s

April 30, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Lev Lurye, cultural historian, St. Petersburg

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