5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Two Decades after El Salvador’s Peace Accords: Current Challenges

January 30, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:30am
In the twenty years since the signing of the Peace Accords, El Salvador has made impressive progress in expanding political and media freedoms, reforming the military and security forces, lowering rates of poverty and inequality, improving respect for human rights, and reforming electoral institutions. Today, however, El Salvador faces unprecedented security and economic challenges. An upsurge in transnational crime, including narcotics, weapons, and human trafficking, has intersected with longstanding problems of gang violence such that El Salvador suffers one of the highest homicide rates in the world. El Salvador’s economy continues to struggle amidst the global recession and weak economic recovery in the United States, the country’s largest export market.

How Cyber and Space Capabilities Affect Nuclear Weapons Policy

January 27, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
Michael Nacht, Professor of Public Policy, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, will discuss how cyber and space capabilities affect nuclear weapons policy.

Recent Developments in Nigeria: Subsidies, Spills and Security

January 30, 2012 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
Endowed with an abundance of natural resource wealth and perhaps the largest human resource potential on the African continent, Nigeria is also burdened by various challenges that threaten the country’s prospects for long-term development and stability. Ambassador Eunice Reddick, former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria Howard Jeter, and Shell Oil Corporate Communications Director Olav Ljosne discuss the country’s long-term challenges.

Dependent America? How Canada and Mexico Construct U.S. Power

February 21, 2012 // 9:00am — 11:00am
In Dependent America?, Stephen Clarkson and Matto Mildenberger explore the extent to which U.S. power is a function of its capacity to mobilize other states’ material and moral support. The authors presented the book, and discussants commented on it.

The Hungarian "Exception": Lessons in Political Economy

February 01, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Could Hungary's experience as a European Union member state be instructive? During the past decade the country's macroeconomic policies were characterized by sharp changes first under a socialist and later under a center-right government. George Kopits, Wilson Center Senior Scholar and former chair of Hungary's Fiscal Council, will assess the country's fiscal and monetary policies, as well as its overall economic performance and institution-building efforts against the backdrop of the deepening European financial crisis.

Mexico Today

January 13, 2012 // 9:00am — 1:45pm
A Seminar Convened by CIDAC and the Woodrow Wilson Center Mexico Institute

Is Foreign Aid Worth the Cost?

January 23, 2012 // 4:00pm — 6:00pm
Bipartisan support for foreign aid has led to notable successes, such as the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and long-running scholarship and technical programs for international students. Yet the U.S. public and many in Congress remain deeply skeptical of the value of such funding, questioning if it’s a fair trade-off when similar investments may be needed at home.

Putting Adolescent Mothers on the Development Agenda

January 11, 2012 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
Each year, 350,000 women die of pregnancy-related causes and 25 percent of these women are between the ages of 15 and 19. Sadia Chowdhury from the World Bank and Jennifer Redner of the International Women’s Health Coalition highlight the need for repositioning maternal health and adolescent girls on the world’s development agenda.

Political Demography: How Population Changes Are Reshaping International Security and National Politics

January 10, 2012 // 12:00pm — 5:00pm
“The world’s population is changing in ways that are historically unprecedented,” said Jack Goldstone, co-editor of the new book, "Political Demography: How Population Changes Are Reshaping International Security and National Politics."

The New Geopolitics of Transatlantic Relations: Coordinated Responses to Common Dangers

February 23, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The United States and Europe encounter many of the same foreign policy challenges, challenges that diversely impact the two regions and produce different-but often complementary-responses. In his latest book "The New Geopolitics of Transatlantic Relations," author Stefan Fröhlich develops a framework for future U.S.-Europe relations as the two world powers work toward meaningful and logical solutions to their shared foreign policy problems.

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