5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Geopolitical Gambits and Ordinary Citizens: Attitudes in South-East Ukraine and Crimea

February 13, 2015 // 11:30am — 12:30pm
This talk presented the results of survey work conducted in December 2014 funded by the Political Science division of the National Science Foundation on evolving attitudes in conflict regions. The survey focuses on Southeast Ukraine (excluding the war zones of Donetsk and Luhansk) and Crimea, comparing attitudes towards Maidan, Russian actions, MH 17, Novorossiya, political actors, and NATO.

Crossroads or Crisis? The Future of the Mexican Left

February 23, 2015 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute hosted a discussion on the future of the left in Mexico and the challenges the country faces.

Property Rights and Wrongs In Russia Today

February 11, 2015 // 3:30pm — 5:00pm
The protection of property rights remains one of the most contentious issues in present-day Russia. From historically weak ownership rights to unclear laws to the reliance on offshore accounts, Russian property rights consistently seem to be under threat. This panel discussed historical, legal, and political attempts to enforce property rights and why this issue continues to be so controversial today.

Anonymous Soldiers: The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947

February 26, 2015 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Bruce Hoffman speaks about his latest book, Anonymous Soldier: The Stuggle for Israel, 1917-1947, which examines the critical period in the establishment of Israel, chronicling three decades of growing anticolonial unrest that culminated in the end of British rule and the UN resolution to create two separate states.

The Struggle for Order: Hegemony, Hierarchy and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia

February 23, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
It is often understood that contemporary politics in the region is marked by balance of power activity that precedes an inevitable power transition when China’s power “catches up” with that of the United States. In The Struggle for Order: Hegemony, Hierarchy and Transition in Post-Cold War East Asia, however, Australian National University’s Evelyn Goh argues that U.S. hegemony has been consolidated in East Asia in spite of China’s rise, because of the crucial support of other regional states which prefer a U.S.-led order.

Russia's New Military Doctrine

February 06, 2015 // 10:00am — 11:30am
One of the most anticipated documents of 2014, Russia’s new military doctrine, was signed into law on December 26th. Will it serve as the framework for Russia's adversarial relationship with the West, or a carefully crafted revision that offers opportunities for rapprochement? The participants examined changes in the doctrine, reviewed Russia's military actions in 2014, and provided perspectives on the evolving capabilities of Russia's armed forces.

Dynamics Among Nations: A Conversation with Hilton Root

February 25, 2015 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
STIP is proud to host Dr. Hilton Root to discuss the ideas in his book Dynamics among Nations: The Evolution of Legitimacy and Development in Modern States (MIT Press). In the book, Root explores the use of complexity models to understand local and international governance challenges, particularly in light of declining Western liberal internationalism.

International Aid to Fight Ebola: Japanese and U.S. Perspectives on Challenges of Combating Communicable Diseases

February 18, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Efforts to fight the outbreak of Ebola have not only led to a flurry of assistance from nations worldwide, but have also highlighted the need for global cooperation in preventing and controlling pandemic outbreaks across borders. Join us to assess how Japanese and U.S. non-profit organizations and private corporations have played a key role in advancing research as well as assistance to help control outbreaks, and what can be done to improve private-public cooperation in stemming communicable diseases.

Countering Violent Extremism in Pakistan: Opportunities and Obstacles for Civil Society

February 26, 2015 // 2:30pm — 4:30pm
The December 16, 2014, school massacre in Peshawar is a sobering reminder of the still-potent threat of militancy in Pakistan. Encouragingly, nongovernmental organizations have been developing grassroots initiatives to counter violent extremism. These promising efforts, however, have to this point not grown into a nationwide campaign. What does Pakistani civil society hope to achieve with its anti-extremism movement?

Egyptian Women: Small Steps Ahead on a Very Long Journey

February 10, 2015 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Women were pivotal cogs in the wheel of Egypt's political development over the past four years. Whether it was the popular uprisings against former President Hosni Mubarak or Islamic rule, or referenda or elections, women were called upon at times of the country's greatest need and never failed to heed the call. Now that the country is gearing up for parliamentary elections, will women's efforts finally be recognized with appropriate political representation and will their voices be heard?

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