5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Rethinking US International Broadcasting: A Conversation on Mission, Strategy, and Organization

April 22, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
By many accounts, U.S. international broadcasting’s mission is unclear, its attachment to U.S. foreign policy strategies tenuous, and its organizational structure ineffective. Many see the entire enterprise as broken. For a new assessment, “Reassessing U.S. International Broadcasting,” co-authors S. Enders Wimbush and Elizabeth M. Portale interviewed some 30 individuals with extensive experience in foreign policy strategy, international relations, international broadcasting, public diplomacy, and promotion of human rights and democracy. Join us in a discussion on the future of US international broadcasting.

South Asia Consultation on Maternal Health: Regional Dialogue and Way Forward

March 31, 2015 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
The state of maternal health in South Asia is difficult to assess. Although rates of maternal mortality are declining between 2 and 2.5 percent a year overall, the region’s massive population – one fifth of the world and over 1 billion people in India alone – means it still accounts for one out of three maternal deaths.

A Path to Win the War on Pollution? Environmental Law Reform in China

April 14, 2015 // 9:00am — 11:00am
The pressure on polluters in China is likely to intensify with the revisions of the Air Pollution Prevention and Control Law and moving towards the creation of a national framework for emissions trading.

China 1945 / U.S.-China 2015

April 08, 2015 // 1:30pm — 3:00pm
Richard Bernstein’s new book, China 1945, explores the histories, interests, assumptions, and personalities that shaped bilateral relations for three decades in the final year of World War II. His gripping study asks whether an opportunity to forge productive relations with the PRC was “lost” by China hands and American leaders, or whether the United States of the mid-20th Century was faced with an essentially Chinese drama in which it could play only a minor role.

Call the Midwife: A Conversation About the Rising Global Midwifery Movement

March 23, 2015 // 9:00am — 4:30pm
The world is about to hit a “turning point” in maternal and newborn health, said Laura Laski, chief of the sexual and reproductive health at UNFPA, at the Wilson Center on March 23. “In terms of strengthening the new health system for achieving the MDGS or any other goals, we have to focus on the human resources for health.” In particular, midwives.

Criminal Justice in an Emerging Democracy: Perspectives from Mexico's Inmates

March 27, 2015 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Mexico Institute was pleased to host an event on Mexico's criminal justice reform, focusing on the inmates' perspectives.

Murdering Patrice Lumumba

March 30, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
When Belgium relinquished control of the Belgian Congo in June 1960, a charismatic Patrice Lumumba became prime minister of the new Republic. Stability immediately broke down. The army mutinied, while Katanga Province seceded. Six months later Lumumba was murdered in Katanga; his undisputed rule as Congo’s first democratically elected leader had lasted ten weeks. Over fifty years later, the circumstances and symbolism of Lumumba’s assassination still troubled people around the world. Bruce Kuklick examines this defining event in postcolonial Africa. He reveals a tangled international political history in which many people—black and white, well-meaning and ruthless, African, European, and American—bear responsibility for the untimely death of a national dream.

Iraq: Now and After ISIS

April 02, 2015 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Ambassador Sumaida’ie, who recently returned from Iraq, will discuss the evolution of the struggle in Iraq is both complex and consequential. The outcome is going to be a major factor in determining the future shape of the region, and will have a significant impact on global geopolitics. The United States as well as other players should have a clear eyed assessment of where things are heading, and what needs to be done if the direction of events is not palatable.

The War in Ukraine: The Roots of Russian Conduct

March 19, 2015 // 10:00am — 11:30am
A year after the annexation of Crimea and the start of hostilities in Eastern Ukraine, the sequence of events leading up to the crisis are well established. Yet these events find their origins in Russia's recent and distant past, as well as the EU's image of a modern, post-WWII Europe.

Atomic Aversion and Just War Principles

April 24, 2015 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Scott Sagan, 2015 awardee of the National Academy of Science’s Estes Award, will speak at the Wilson Center’s Nonproliferation Forum on “Atomic Aversion and Just War Principles: New Evidence on US Public Opinion”

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