5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Arab Spring and the State of Egypt’s Antiquities

April 14, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:00pm
The current instability in Egypt is having its toll on its cultural heritage that is being lost and desecrated. Different archaeological sites commissioned by antiquities dealers leaving are being vandalized. The local communities are also involved due to economic hardship. Both objects and archaeological records are being lost for good. This very fast and speedy loss is the worst Egypt has ever faced.

Cities at the Center of the World

April 22, 2014 // 9:00am — 4:00pm
In collaboration with the Center for Global Studies at George Mason University, The Wilson Center’s Urban Sustainability Laboratory invites you to a discussion of the nexus between urban growth and globalization. Please join leading urban scholars, practitioners and policy makers for a discussion of the social, spatial and political terrain of cities as critical global centers.

Labor and Structural Reforms in Mexico

April 04, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:15am
The Mexico Institute is pleased to invite you to a discussion with Mexico’s Secretary of Labor and Social Welfare, Alfonso Navarrete Prida. In November of 2012, Mexico’s congress approved a new labor law that fundamentally alters Mexico’s labor markets, making them much more flexible than before.

The End of the Union? London, Edinburgh, and the Battle for Scottish Independence

April 01, 2014 // 10:00am — 11:30am
On 18 September, Scotland will hold a referendum on its 300 year-old union with the rest of the United Kingdom. It is an historic event with the campaign battle already well under way. The Center’s Global Europe Program will convene several leading experts to discuss the referendum campaign and the wider implications of a ‘Yes’ vote for Edinburgh, London and Europe.

Environmental Information: The Roles of Experts and the Public

April 29, 2014 // 10:00am — 11:30am
Access to environmental information and its impact on environmental decision making will be explored, with special attention to the role of geographical information and geographical information systems and to citizen science.

Assessing the Rebalance: The Evolution of U.S. Interests in Asia

April 10, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
President Barack Obama’s pivot to Asia has been developed into a broader, more coherent strategy since announced in November 2011, and rebadged as the “rebalance” to reflect continuities in U.S. interest. Join Hamish McDonald as he discusses the implications of this rebalance.

Public Interest Law in Russia

April 03, 2014 // 9:00am — 11:00am
Public interest law has developed significantly in Russia over the past two decades with lawyers leading the push to enforce the civil and social rights set forth in the 1993 constitution. In light of recent government actions, the Russian courtroom has become one of the last protected areas of free speech in the country. The Jackson Foundation and the Kennan Institute convened four of Russia's leading experts to give a briefing on the current state of public interest law.

Is Foreign Policy Bipartisanship Alive on Capitol Hill?

April 09, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
With today's Congress sharply divided along partisan lines, are U.S. lawmakers still capable of reaching across the aisle on foreign policy? This public program will examine the congressional politics of U.S. foreign policy making and the prospects for foreign policy bipartisanship.

Oil Sparks in the Amazon: Local Conflicts, Indigenous Populations, and Natural Resources

March 21, 2014 // 9:00am — 11:00am
The Latin American Program hosted a discussion of Patricia I. Vásquez's new book, "Oil Sparks in the Amazon: Local Conflicts, Indigenous Populations, and Natural Resources," which examines oil-related local conflicts in Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia.

Overcoming History's Hurdles: Rising Above the Challenges Facing Relations Between Japan, Korea, and China

April 02, 2014 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
Relations between three of Asia’s biggest economies are at their lowest in decades, as growing nationalistic fervor overwhelms multiple common challenges facing Seoul, Tokyo, and Beijing. Why are the three governments stumbling in history’s hurdles?

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