6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

DC Chinese Film Festival featuring COP SHOP II (差馆II)

September 05, 2014 // 12:00pm — 3:30pm
We are delighted to invite you to a film screening at the Wilson Center for the upcoming 2014 DC Chinese Film Festival.

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

September 12, 2014 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Public Engagement in an Age of Complexity, part of the Science & Technology Innovation Program, is proud to host economist David Colander to discuss the ideas in his new book, Complexity and the Art of Public Policy: Solving Society’s Problems from the Bottom Up.

Turkey, Iraq, and the Kurdistan Regional Government

August 25, 2014 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
The advances of ISIS have reheated the debate on the future of Iraq. The country is threatened by a new wave of violence and destruction, as a large swath of territory has turned into a conflict zone and an uprising has shaken the political order. Turkey has both opportunities and challenges in Iraq, and keeps a close eye on the situation there. In this discussion, experts will address the future of Iraq and the KRG in the context of the current crisis, and will shed light on Turkey’s perspectives on the KRG, energy issues, minorities, and Iraq in general.

Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe

August 26, 2014 // 3:30pm — 5:00pm
What should the European Union’s policy priorities be in the coming institutional cycle? How can the economic benefits of the European Union be determined? The Global Europe Program brings together experts from the European Parliament to present one of its most recent studies. ‘Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe, 2014-19,’ illustrates the work-in-progress results of a long-term project to identify and analyze the ‘cost of non-Europe’ in a number of policy fields. This concept is used to quantify the potential efficiency gained in today’s European economy by pursuing a given set of policy initiatives – from a wider and deeper digital single market and an integrated energy market to a genuine common defense policy.

"They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide"

August 14, 2014 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–1916 were committed.

Turkey’s Presidential Elections 2014 - What do they mean for Turkey’s democratization process, the Kurdish question and Turkey’s foreign policy?

September 11, 2014 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Turkey’s Presidential elections in August 2014 offer an opportunity to evaluate the country’s progress under the rule of Mr. Erdogan for the past 12 years and to discuss Turkey’s political, economic and social transformations.

Putting the South Caucasus in Perspective

August 05, 2014 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia have been independent states for more than 23 years. Although geographically contiguous, they differ in language, religion, and political and security orientation. How is each country faring in state-building, developing democracy, and improving economic performance? What are their relationships with Russia and the West, and with each other? How does their historical experience influence current developments, and what are their long term prospects?

Preempting Environmental and Human Security Crises in Africa: Science-Based Planning for Climate Variability Threats

August 20, 2014 // 10:00am — 1:00pm
Development and poverty reduction are inextricably linked to the water, energy and security nexus in Africa. There was some consensus that the impact of climate variability and extreme climate events depends not only on the severity of the crisis, but also on the vulnerability of the affected population – which is correlated with the level of development along with governance and other socio-cultural factors. Just as poverty can put communities at an increased level of vulnerability, so can sustainable development lead to improvements in climate-resilience and human security.

National Security and Climate Change: What Do We Need to Know?

July 29, 2014 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
What do a White House senior adviser, a member of Congress, scientists, military planners, and business people have in common? At a June 4 symposium with 36 leaders from federal agencies, state and local government, research organizations, business, and academia, they all agreed that climate change is having an impact on national security that will only increase with time. This briefing will focus on the key recommendations and consensus points that emerged from the June discussion and highlight the next steps for action.

Freedom of Expression in Mexico: Analyzing the Impact of the Telecom Reform

July 31, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, in collaboration with Freedom House, hosted a discussion of the impact of the Telecom Reform. A panel of leading thinkers discussed the telecommunications reform and its implications for freedom of expression, as well as the ongoing debate about the reform’s secondary legislation.

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