6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

ISAB Report on U.S.-Russia Relations

January 14, 2015 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The International Security Advisory Board has released its 2014 report on the state of U.S.-Russia relations. The report offers a number of recommendations, both explicit and implied, which respond to current Russian actions, identify long-term implications for strategic stability, and address resuming and expanding engagement with the Russian Federation when it becomes appropriate to do so.

From Farm to Roundtable: Innovative Partnerships to Improve China's Meat Supply Chains

February 06, 2015 // 9:00am — 11:00am
The first amendments to China's Food Safety Law are likely to pass this year. To increase the efficiency, safety and sustainability of the country's food supply chains, especially meat, the Chinese government and industries also have expanded partnerships with international organizations.

A Year of Crisis: The Middle East in 2015

January 20, 2015 // 9:30am — 11:00am
The Middle East, already the world’s most volatile region, faces some of its toughest challenges in a century: Borders have been redrawn in Syria and Iraq. States from Libya to Yemen are collapsing. Autocracy is again on the rise in Egypt. And diplomacy is teetering with Iran. Meanwhile, the United States is being sucked back into the region. Come hear four top experts explore the crises of 2015, the stakes, and where they’re headed.

The Challenge of Governance: Lessons from Mexico City - A Conversation with Mayor Miguel Ángel Mancera

January 15, 2015 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Atlantic Council were pleased to host a discussion with Mexico City's Mayor, Miguel Ángel Mancera. This event was conducted in Spanish.

The State of Citizen Security in Mexico: 2014 in Review and the Year Ahead

January 20, 2015 // 2:00pm — 5:30pm
The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute hosted its Second Annual Mexican Security Review, The State of Citizen Security in Mexico: 2014 in Review and the Year Ahead. The forum provided a careful examination of security challenges in Mexico, featuring presentations from leading policy analysts. Of particular interest were the available indicators of crime trends, analysis of the specific policy measures of the Peña Nieto administration, and the efforts of civil society to confront recent security problems in Mexico.

Whither the World: The Political Economy of the Future

January 13, 2015 // 3:00pm — 4:00pm
How will global forces impact Europe’s economic future? Dr. Grzegorz Kolodko employs a holistic approach to answer fundamental questions about the course of future generations. An interdisciplinary approach is necessary, since the future of the world and civilization depends not only on what happens in the economic sphere but also vis-à-vis cultural, social, political, demographic, technological, and ecological processes.

Georgia’s Foreign Policy Priorities

December 19, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:00am
The Caucasus has experienced its own aftershocks from the Ukrainian crisis, especially in Georgia, which recently witnessed major turnover in the key foreign policy positions. The Georgian government appears increasingly divided as the Georgian Dream coalition faces several major domestic and international challenges. Mr. Zviad Dzidziguri, Deputy Chairman of the Parliament of Georgia, addressed the country’s foreign policy priorities in the region, with NATO, and with the European Union.

Relentless Reformer: Josephine Roche and the Persistence of Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America

January 12, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Josephine Roche, as the second-highest-ranking woman in the New Deal government, generated the conversation that Americans are still having about the federal role in health care. In analyzing Roche’s astonishing life story, which included stints as a vice cop in the 1910s and director of the UMWA’s Welfare and Retirement Fund in the 1960s, Robyn Muncy demonstrates that political commitments born in the earliest twentieth century produced not only the New Deal, as other historians have argued, but also survived to ignite and shape the Great Society.

CANCELLED - Bookmen at War: Libraries, Intelligence, and Cultural Policy in World War II

January 26, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
***Due to snow in the weather forecast, this week's Washington History Seminar has been cancelled.*** The Monuments Men have been justly celebrated for their rescue of art treasures in World War II. The focus on individual heroism, however, obscures the larger impact of the war on modern policies and practices toward information, knowledge, and culture. Kathy Peiss explores the role of librarians, collectors, and intelligence agents to explain why and how books mattered in a time of conflict and devastation.

"Political Insults: How Offenses Escalate Conflict"

December 17, 2014 // 3:30pm — 5:00pm
In her new book, Karina V. Korostelina offers a novel framework for analyzing the ways in which seemingly minor insults between ethnic groups, nations, and other types of groups escalate to disproportionately violent behavior and political conflict. The book shows that insult can take many forms and has the power to destablize and redefine social and power hierarchies. Korostelina uses her model to explore recent conflicts in Russia, Ukraine, and elsewhere, and to explain the complicated dynamics associated with them.

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