6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Energy & Security

The Energy Security Renaissance in North America

November 06, 2014 // 10:30am — 12:00pm
The recent surge in North American oil and natural gas is moving the balance of power in energy production from the Middle East to the West. Soon, Mexican energy reforms and newly accessible Arctic resources will add to this North American energy boom. U.S. energy infrastructure and policies must adapt to meet the energy revolution occuring in North America. At the same time, energy consumption is growing exponentially in Asia, raising new challenges and opportunities for East-West cooperation in international energy.

Tracking a Changing Climate: Citizen Science Contributions to the National Climate Assessment

November 18, 2014 // 2:00pm — 4:30pm
Join us for a public forum exploring ways in which crowd-based approaches, such as citizen science and community-based monitoring, are and can be used to track climate change and support indicators or indicator systems.

Freeing Yazidi Women: Combating a 21st Century Slavery Revival Project

October 31, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:00am
Matthew Barber, who has conducted research within the Yazidi community and who was in Kurdistan Province when it was attacked by ISIS this summer, and Murad Ismail, a Yazidi-American advocate for the Yazidi community, originally from Sinjar, are both members of the Yazidi delegation visiting Washington, D.C. and are working on efforts to rescue kidnapped Yazidi women.

FAPESP-U.S. Collaborative Research on the Amazon

October 28, 2014 // 8:30am — 5:30pm
The São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) and the United States Department of Energy Office of Science, in partnership with the Wilson Center's Brazil Institute, held an all-day symposium on collaborative research projects led by scientists in the state of São Paulo, Brazil and in the U.S., targeting the discovery of new science about the Amazon.

Prospects for a Nuclear Agreement with Iran: A Discussion in Honor of Michael Adler

November 12, 2014 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
The world’s major powers (the P5+1) and Iran have been negotiating since last January to convert an interim nuclear accord into a final agreement, and now face a November 24 deadline. As this critical date nears, please join us for this meeting to address the outcome of the negotiations—whether successful in yielding an agreement, extended to allow further negotiations, or at a point of breakdown. What are the implications for U.S. policy toward Iran moving forward, as well as for the broader global effort to forestall the proliferation of nuclear weapons? This event honors the late Michael Adler, distinguished journalist and Public Policy Scholar at the Wilson Center, whose illuminating work improved the quality of public discourse on this vital issue.

Sino-Soviet Relations and the Dilemmas of Socialist Bloc Cooperation: Czechoslovaks in Shanghai, 1956-57

October 27, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
In contrast to traditional approaches to Sino-Soviet relations that focus on ideological conflict and the role of powerful personalities such as Chairman Mao and Nikita Khrushchev, Austin Jersild draws on the experiences of advisers in China in the 1950s to place the Sino-Soviet alliance and split within the broader history of socialist bloc cooperation and the Cold War competition with the United States.

Impact of Low Oil Prices: Petro Power or Petro Poverty?

October 31, 2014 // 10:00am — 11:30am
As oil prices drop, The Wilson Center is focusing on the political and economic implications of lower petroleum prices, as long as they continue, in a number of key countries. Leading experts will speak to what the future could hold for Russia, Iraq, Nigeria, and Venezuela with an added perspective on Saudi pricing power.

“A Sort of Chautauqua”

October 23, 2014 // 4:00pm — 6:00pm
The Chautauqua is a traveling tent-show that originated in America during the 1800s. These traveling shows featured popular talks intended to edify and entertain, improve the mind and bring culture and enlightenment to the ears and thoughts of the hearer. It is a model that inspires Oleksandr Boichenko, a literary critic, publicist, essayist and translator from Chernivtsi, an emerging center for Ukrainian literature. Boichenko’s Chautauqua at the Wilson Center featured his writings and views on the impact of recent events, from the Maidan to the tenuous ceasefire, on Ukrainian culture.

World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Book Launch)

October 23, 2014 // 10:00am — 12:00pm
'World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century' seeks to provide the top-level insights and detailed projections that policymakers and researchers need to make decisions supporting sustainable development in the 21st century. This book is the culmination of an international effort of more than 550 population experts, led by researchers at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and the Wittgenstein Centre in Vienna. It provides multi-dimensional projections of age, gender, and education distributions for 195 countries through the year 2100.

The First Binational Forum on Migration and the Right to an Identity

November 12, 2014 // 11:30am — 2:30pm
The Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Be Foundation were pleased to host the First Binational Forum on Migration and the Right to an Identity: The Double Invisibility of Mexican Migrants in light of Potential U.S. Immigration Reform.

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