6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Nigeria in Focus: An Assessment of the 2015 Elections

April 07, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
On April 7, 2015, the Woodrow Wilson Center Africa Program hosted a panel of experts to assess the outcome of the recent national elections in Nigeria, held on March 28 after a six-week postponement. In an historic election, opposition candidate Muhammadu Buhari of the All Progressive Congress Party (APC) defeated incumbent Goodluck Jonathan of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP).

A Conversation with the President of Tanzania, Jakaya Kikwete

April 03, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete reflected on his presidency, examining his accomplishments, some of the key challenges he has faced, and lessons learned from his 10 years in office.

Assessing U.S. Sanctions: Impact, Effectiveness, Consequences

April 16, 2015 // 8:45am — 3:30pm
Full video from all three panels as well as the keynote address are available here.

Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan

April 13, 2015 // 2:00pm — 4:15pm
With nearly 98 percent of the population believed to be nationals of the country, Japan can seem to be a racially homogenous society. For foreigners already calling Japan home, though, living in a country where there is little racial diversity can be a challenge. That includes those who are half-Japanese.

Nudging Our Way towards Energy Efficiency: Psychology, Behavior and the Environment

April 23, 2015 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Even as society seeks to improve overall energy efficiency, we make individual decisions every day that have a wasteful effect on our energy use, from driving rather than walking short distances to leaving our computers on when not in use. Please join us for a candid discussion about how psychology and behavioral economics can begin to address our most pressing energy and environmental challenges – and how this can potentially improve policy choices in government and beyond.

Book Talk: "Gulag Town, Company Town Forced Labor and Its Legacy in Vorkuta"

March 25, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
What was the relationship between the Gulag and Soviet society? What was the legacy of Stalin's massive system of forced labor? This talk explored answers to these questions using the case of Vorkuta, one of the Soviet Union's most notorious prison camp complexes.

Islands as Champions of Resilience

March 25, 2015 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
In contrast to the common narrative of small-island states being among the most vulnerable to climate change, their growing experience in climate-compatible development, disaster prevention, and coordinating information and aid in new ways may be a valuable asset, said panelists at the Wilson Center on March 25.

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

March 24, 2015 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.

Book Talk: New Translation "Anna Karenina"

March 23, 2015 // 2:00pm — 3:00pm
This talk explored the translation history of Anna Karenina, and the particular role played by Constance Garnett and Louise and Aylmer Maude in establishing Tolstoy’s reputation in the English-speaking world. This led to a discussion of some of the novel’s less well-known, but surprisingly revealing aspects, as seen from the grass-roots level of a contemporary translator, and, through a comparison of the fictional Anna with her real-life British contemporary Louise Jopling, a reconsideration of the novel’s relationship to the “woman question” in late 19th-century Russia.

Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America

April 13, 2015 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America, the first systematic analysis of these conflicts among US allies, argues that bureaucratic interests, rather than international mistrust or diplomatic missteps, fueled protracted rivalry among allies. Author Christopher Darnton discusses four critical conflict-resolution initiatives between Argentina and Brazil from 1949 to 1980, based on research in both countries’ foreign ministry archives.

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