6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

A Briefing on the Niger Delta: Where Things Stand

April 26, 2013 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
Contrary to the deadly and deeply troubling situation in northern Nigeria and parts of the Middle Belt, ongoing insecurity, abductions, and politically-motivated violence in the oil-producing Niger Delta, a hotbed of unrest and instability just a few years ago, seems to be abating.

Bureaucracy, Citizenship and Remembrance in Wartime Iraq

April 22, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The Iraq war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance with the Iraq government managing resistance and religious diversity and shaping a public culture in which soldiering and martyrdom became markers of privileged citizenship. The men and families of those who fought and died during the Iran-Iraq and First Gulf wars have memories not only of the political, social, and cultures changes in Iraq but also of the “normalization” of war.

The Bread Revolutions of 2011 and the Political Economies of Transition

April 30, 2013 // 10:00am — 11:30am
During the 2011 uprisings, Arab protestors channeled decades of discontent with failed economic policy. However, the demise of leaders will not be enough to answer this discontent nor ensure productive development. Scholarship on the political determinates of economic development finds that the common recipe of expanding the private sector and increasing trade openness may be valuable, but alone are not sufficient for successful development. The Arab World’s economic path to 2011 included implementation in these areas, yet reform in underlying socio-economic structures and interests lagged. Addressing these conditions constitutes one of the most serious challenges facing Arab economies and politics.

The Green Revolution in China

April 30, 2013 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
Drawing on his chapter in the recently published chinadialogue book China and the Environment: The Green Revolution, Jianqiang Liu relates the role that NGOs, news media and community leaders played in forming an environmental movement opposing a dam on the Tiger Leaping Gorge.

Drug Policy: A 21st Century Approach to Reform

April 25, 2013 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
The illegal drug problem has posed challenges to the United States and Latin America for many decades. While efforts to disrupt the cultivation, processing, and trafficking of drugs to the United States have shown mixed results, the drug trade continues to pose serious threats to citizen security, economic prosperity, environmental conservation, human rights, and democratic governance throughout the hemisphere. In this National Conversation, panelists will address the question of how the U.S. is reforming its policies to address this problem and show sustainable results.
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Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

May 08, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Kate Brown presented "Plutopia", the first history of Richland, Washington and Ozersk, Russia, two communities developed in parallel by opposing nations at the height of the Cold War.
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Believing in Russia - Religious Policy after Communism

April 15, 2013 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Geraldine Fagan presented her new book, “Believing in Russia—Religious Policy after Communism”, which brings together 12 years of research inside Russia on the role of religion in the nation’s politics. She argued that government policy grounded in religious freedom is the only viable option for consolidating Russia’s extraordinary diversity, and reveal that—far from being a Western import—religious freedom has a long tradition in Russia.

Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam

September 05, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History.

Six Moments of Crisis: Inside British Foreign Policy

April 15, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Gill Bennett, former Chief Historian of the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office leads a discussion entitled "Six Moments of Crisis: Inside British Foreign Policy."

Mexico: Commitment to Security and Justice

April 18, 2013 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute hosted Mexico's Secretary of the Interior Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong. Secretary Osorio Chong has served as Secretary of the Interior under President Enrique Peña Nieto since December 2012 and was previously Governor of Hidalgo. His address covered the Peña Nieto administration’s security and justice strategies.

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