6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Arab Awakening: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead

March 08, 2013 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Rami Khouri and Robin Wright assess the past three years of political and economic flux in the Arab world, providing their insights on what they believe will be the challenges to political development moving forward.

Demographic & Environmental Dynamics Shape 'Global Trends 2030' Scenarios

February 26, 2013 // 10:00am — 12:00pm
The newest quadrennial report from the National Intelligence Council identifies the “game-changers, megatrends, and black swans” that may determine the trajectory of world affairs over the next 15 years, including population dynamics and natural resource scarcity.

Challenges to Women’s Security in the MENA Region

March 07, 2013 // 9:00am — 11:00am
The Middle East Program and the Global Women’s Leadership Initiative present a meeting with five women experts who will discuss the challenges to women’s security in the MENA region.

The Rise & Fall of Iran in Arab and Muslim Eyes - A New Poll

March 05, 2013 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Of 20 Arab and Muslim states, 14 have unfavorable opinions of Iran. This fact and more was uncovered in James Zogby’s recent poll of Arab and Muslim opinion on Iran. James Zogby was joined by panelists Haleh Esfandiari, Hisham Melhem, Barbara Slavin, and Marc Lynch in this National Conversation discussion moderated by Tom Gjelten of NPR.

The Devouring Dragon: How China’s Rise Threatens Our Natural World

April 04, 2013 // 9:00am — 10:30am
While China’s rise is often viewed through its wide-ranging political and economic effects on the world, its growing impacts on the physical planet will leave a more permanent legacy. In his new book, The Devouring Dragon, Craig Simons argues that China’s growing consumer demands have pushed China from being a small player in global resource consumption to its most voracious participant in just a decade. China’s transition is already having massive impacts on the environment.

Environmental Film Festival: 'Beijing Besieged by Waste'

March 14, 2013 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
With a population of around 20 million and growing, Beijing’s residents produce unfathomable amounts of waste every day. Between 2008 and 2010, photographer and filmmaker Wang Jiuliang traveled to hundreds of legal and illegal landfills around the capital city to document the less considered side of China’s economic ascent.

How to Improve Brazil's Industrial Growth and Export Performance

February 12, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
On Tuesday February 12, a panel discussed Brazil's industrial outlook and export performance.

Young and Undocumented: The New American Story

February 21, 2013 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Four members of Hoyas for Immigrant Rights, a student advocacy organization at Georgetown University, presented a panel discussion on being young and undocumented.
Photo by Mona Youssef

Unwilling to Wait: Why Activists are Taking the Initiative on the Peace Process

March 04, 2013 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Two youth activists from OneVoice Palestine and OneVoice Israel will speak about their motivations to take personal responsibility to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through grassroots activism. In speaking about the ongoing challenges to resolving the conflict, they will discuss civil society efforts to overcome these obstacles. Given the many transitions taking place in the region, and OneVoice’s experience in the past ten years, Almasri and Bar-Gal will speak about their vision of where future opportunities for Israeli-Palestinian conflict resolution lie and about the important role of the American foreign policy community in moving the peace process forward.
eric lohr thumb

Russian Citizenship: From Empire to Soviet Union

March 25, 2013 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
"Russian Citizenship" is the first book to trace the Russian state’s citizenship policy throughout its history. Focusing on the period from the mid-nineteenth century to the consolidation of Stalin’s power in the 1930s, Eric Lohr considers whom the state counted among its citizens and whom it took pains to exclude. His research reveals that the Russian attitude toward citizenship was less xenophobic and isolationist and more similar to European attitudes than has been previously thought—until the drive toward autarky after 1914 eventually sealed the state off and set it apart.

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