6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Senator Mark Warner

The Start-up Act: Building America’s Entrepreneurial Future

April 24, 2012 // 9:00am — 12:00pm
Senator Jerry Moran (R-KS) and Senator Mark Warner (D-VA), both first term Senators, discussed key components of the Start-up Act, which they have authored and introduced. The two Senators oulined why we need to keep talented people in the United States, especially in STEM fields and how the government can best serve entrepreneurs through regulations, taxes, and encouraging talent.
Delivering Solutions

Learning From Success: Ministers of Health Discuss Accelerating Progress in Maternal Survival

April 23, 2012 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
On April 23rd Ministers of Health of Afghanistan, Cambodia, the Dominican Republic, and the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Health, Rwanda discussed the drivers of successful maternal health programs and how such efforts can be accelerated and sustained throughout the developing world.

Language Makes History: Intersections of Language, Gender and Politics

April 18, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The National Women’s History Museum and United States Studies of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars are hosting a lecture in the series "The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History," with Dr. Robin Lakoff, author of the new book "Language Makes History: Intersections of Language, Gender and Politics."

Why the U.S. Is Not Destined to Decline: A Debate

May 02, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Robert Lieber, author of the new book "Power and Willpower in the American Future: Why the US is Not Destined to Decline" will debate the book’s premise with Michael Mandelbaum, Christian A. Herter Professor of American Foreign Policy, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

European Perspective on the Current State of Transatlantic Relations

May 02, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
Transatlantic Relations have always been in the mainstream of international politics. Crucial issues determined by a strong political will and various policy decisions on both sides of the Atlantic have necessitated important transatlantic decision making. Current themes of transatlantic relations include the future of the economy, war and peace in the Mediterranean basin, energy efficiency, the security of energy supplies, and terrorism.

The Tragic Irony of America’s Worldwide Struggle for Democracy

April 30, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Tony Smith discusses liberal internationalism

The Allies and the Role of Lend-Lease in WWII: The Russian View

May 29, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Cosponsored by the Russian-American Community Center of Florida, Open Dialogue (Moscow) and the Spiritual Diplomacy Foundation, in this discussion Nikolai Borodin, Director, Museum of the Allies and Lend-Lease in Moscow, will explore the history of the museum and the role of America in the Lend-Lease program during World War II. “The Museum of the Allies and Lend-Lease is a unique, one-of-a-kind museum,” said Borodin. The museum was established inside a former school and has been open for 8 years. Borodin said he wished to honor and show gratitude to the United States and its veterans who rendered aid to the Soviet Union during World War II. “Those years were a very trying time and the aid received from the U.S. was substantial,” he stated. In Russia, the museum is dedicated to the WWII allies but mainly to the American contribution.

The GEF at 20

April 11, 2012 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
On April 11th, Monique Barbut of the Global Environment Facility will discuss climate change and the lead up to the Rio+20 conference.

Women’s Top-Level Political Participation in Ukraine: Challenges and Opportunities

May 21, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
“Ukrainians’ record on women’s inclusion in politics is indefensible,” said Tamara Martsenyuk, Chopivsky Post-Doctoral Fellow, CREEES, Stanford University, and Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, at a 21 May 2012 Kennan Institute event. During the twenty years since Ukrainian independence, women have held less than ten percent of the seats in political office in Ukraine. Yet, women constitute forty five percent of the management force in the civil service sector, albeit mainly at the local level.

Book Discussion: <i>Stage Fright: Politics and the Performing Arts in Late Imperial Russia</i>

May 14, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
“Were the performing arts in imperial Russia an outlet for opposition politics or ideas? The historiography of the era predicts the answer is yes, but the reality is actually the opposite,” said Paul du Quenoy, Associate Professor, Department of History and Archeology, American University of Beirut, at a 14 May 2012 Kennan Institute lecture. Presenting the research behind his book, Stage Fright: Politics and the Performing Arts in Late Imperial Russia, du Quenoy contended that theatrical artists and artistic institutions of the era avoided politics, or were at least resistant to staging productions critical of the state.

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