6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Into the Fold or Out in the Cold? NATO Expansion and European Security after the Cold War

May 02, 2014 // 10:00am — 12:00pm
Twenty years ago, the 1994 Brussels Summit marked the beginning of NATO’s post-Cold War expansion. It was a process that resonated differently on opposite sides of the former “iron curtain” in the midst of complex and evolving relations between Russia and the West. This year will be no less pivotal for European security as the crisis in Ukraine brings renewed attention to Eastern Europe and the drawdown of NATO forces in Afghanistan continues. Amid these new and ongoing challenges, NATO will hold a summit in September to chart its future course. This panel of distinguished senior officials and experts will reflect on the steps that created Europe’s current security architecture, as well as the advantages and constraints NATO will face in addressing the security challenges of the 21st century.

Increasing Resilience to Climate Change

April 23, 2014 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
As the climate continues to change in dramatic and more-or-less permanent ways, policymakers everywhere are increasingly tasked with cultivating resilience – preparing communities for natural disasters and social change. “It’s now more clear than ever that climate change is here, and it’s real, and it’s happening, and people are really feeling the impacts,” said Cathleen Kelly of the Center for American Progress at the Wilson Center on April 23.

Gamers: Athletes for the Next Generation

May 07, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Is someone who plays a computer game really an athlete? According to the State Department, they are.

America's Great Game: The CIA's Secret Arabists and the Shaping of the Modern Middle East

April 21, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The CIA has an almost diabolical reputation in the Arab world. Yet, in the early years of its existence, the 1940s and 1950s, the Agency was distinctly pro-Arab, lending its support to the leading Arab nationalist of the day, Gamal Nasser, and conducting an anti-Zionist publicity campaign at home in the U.S. Drawing on a wide range of sources, Hugh Wilford uncovers the world of early CIA “Arabism,” its origins, characteristic forms, and eventual demise.
Photo by Mona Youssef

The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames

May 22, 2014 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer Kai Bird appears in a conversation with Washington Post columnist David Ignatius to discuss Bird's new biography, The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames. Robert Ames was the CIA officer who created the first clandestine contacts with the Palestine Liberation Organization. He was among those killed in the April 1983 truck bomb attack that destroyed the U.S. Embassy in Beirut.
flickr/Peretz Partensky

The Political Origins of Economic Reform in Pakistan

May 01, 2014 // 10:30am — 12:00pm
Pakistan has long struggled to implement reforms and to adapt to an increasingly globalized world. Today, the country's mixed track record in terms of putting in place the right reforms presents one of the leading challenges to stability.

What Can Governments Do About Falling Birth Rates?

April 17, 2014 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
“We have a fairly unique moment in the history of the world,” said Steven Philip Kramer, a professor at National Defense University, at the Wilson Center on April 17. “There’s never been a time when people have voluntarily produced fewer children than is necessary for sustaining the population.”

Envisioning a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border

June 12, 2014 // 8:15am — 4:00pm
This conference will bring together top policymakers, the private sector, and civil society from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border to examine ways to improve border management and strengthen the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico.

The Politics of Crime in Mexico: Democratic Governance in a Security Trap

April 16, 2014 // 9:00am — 10:30am
The Mexico Institute and the Inter-American Dialogue are pleased to invite you to the presentation of the book, The Politics of Crime in Mexico: Democratic Governance in a Security Trap, by John Bailey.

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