6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

The Archive Thief: Zosa Szajkowski and the Salvaging of French Jewish History

September 15, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
In the aftermath of the Holocaust, Jewish historian Zosa Szajkowski stole tens of thousands of documents about Jews from French archives and sold them to libraries in the United States. To understand why he did it, Leff takes us into the “backstage” of the archives, and reveals the powerful ideological, economic and scientific forces that made Holocaust-era Jewish scholars care more deeply than ever before about preserving the remnants of their past.

From Sarajevo, 1914 to Southeastern Europe, 2014: Wars, Transitions and Controversies

October 15, 2014 // 11:30am — 1:00pm
Drawing on recent scholarship and addressing recent controversies, John Lampe, traces the saga of Southeastern Europe from the explosive mixture of Balkan states and imperial borderlands before the First World War, through the trials that their successors faced during two world wars, the Cold War, and finally the wars of Yugoslavia's dissolution.

American Isolationism: Is it a Myth or a Reality?

September 15, 2014 // 12:30pm — 1:45pm
The Chicago Council releases its 40th anniversary survey of Americans thoughts on foreign policy issues. An expert panel discusses the results, what it means for the future of U.S. policy, and what policymakers should learn from the public.

A Look at the Supreme Court 2014-15 Term

September 22, 2014 // 5:00pm — 6:30pm
The American Bar Association Division for Public Education in conjunction with the Wilson Center are hosting the seventh annual fall "On the Docket" program. Prominent Supreme Court practitioners will hold a discussion and provide their insights into the 2014-2015 Supreme Court term.

World War One: What Were They Thinking? Lessons From the Catastrophe

September 10, 2014 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Why did a small number of European statesmen take the world into the seminal catastrophe of the Great War? The German Chancellor Otto Bismarck had warned in 1880 that “some damned foolish thing in the Balkans” might lead to a terrible war. The shots at Sarajevo did just that a hundred years ago. What have we learned?

Platforms, Pipelines & Policies: Energy & Security in China and Asia Pacific

September 17, 2014 // 10:30am — 12:00pm
China’s search for expanded, more reliable, and more sustainable sources of energy to fuel its development has become a major driver of China’s foreign relations. The challenges and opportunities of China’s rise cannot be understood without expert appraisal of its energy needs and strategies – and consideration of alternative policy responses. China and its periphery was the focus of the second in the Wilson Center’s series on Regional and Global Energy Issues, which was launched in July 2014.

Having Faith in Diplomacy in the 21st Century: Distinguishing Between Noises and Signals

September 10, 2014 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Dr. Mustafa Cerić, Grand Mufti Emeritus of Bosnia and Herzegovina, will address current global geopolitical challenges, notably schisms in the Middle East and its consequences for the European security project and integration of the Western Balkans into European Union and NATO.

Scotland on the Eve of the Independence Referendum

September 03, 2014 // 3:30pm — 5:00pm
On September 18th, Scottish voters will decide whether their country will be the first to secede from a Western-European state in recent history. After two years of campaigning it would seem that politicians, academics, and journalists would have a good understanding of the public sentiment. Using very recent data from the only large-scale, representative, and comprehensive attitudes surveys in Scotland, however, this talk will highlight where the general “wisdom” about Scots’ attitudes towards the referendum may be empirically wrong. The talk will also identify issues that may still move people, in either direction, before casting their vote.

North Korean War Orphans in Transnational Educational Exchange

August 27, 2014 // 2:00pm — 3:00pm
More than 100,000 children from both North and South Korea were orphaned during the Korean War. In 1953, the North Korean government dispatched 1,200 orphans to the People’s Republic of Poland to be educated at a boarding school transformed into an orphanage. The orphans were repatriated after six years, at the insistence of the North Korean government, as tensions between Pyongyang and its communist allies began to emerge. NKIDP Intern Intaek Hong examines the complicated process of how the orphans defined their identity based on their experience of interacting with their Polish teachers—who became like foster parents—and deploying their subjectivity in the process.

The National Plan for Civil Earth Observations

September 04, 2014 // 1:00pm — 2:30pm
This briefing will highlight the key components of the National Plan for Civil Earth Observations, outline its impacts across Federal agencies involved in Earth observations, and review associated efforts to enable interagency coordination.

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