6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Leading the Second Century of Flight

September 18, 2012 // 10:00am — 11:00am
Since the Wright brothers’ first flight, America’s leadership in aerospace has grown our economy and ensured our security. Today, our leadership is threatened by budget constraints at home and heavy investment by other nations abroad. In this National Aerospace Week address, Jim Albaugh will highlight what’s at stake and what steps the U.S. must take to lead the second century of flight. Jim Albaugh is an executive vice president of The Boeing Company. A 37-year Boeing veteran, Albaugh has led the company’s commercial, defense, space and security businesses.

Pulling Pakistan out of Economic Crisis

September 24, 2012 // 11:00am — 12:30pm
This event marks the release of a new study on Pakistan's economy.

Weighing the Benefits and Costs of Military Action Against Iran

September 13, 2012 // 12:30pm — 2:00pm
Former senior national security officials, military officers, and experts with decades of Middle East experience will convene to present the Iran Project’s Report, a balanced, fact-based analysis on the benefits and costs of military action against Iran. Moving the debate past politics and unexamined assumptions about the ability of military action to achieve U.S. objectives, they offer in this report a foundation for clear thinking about the potential use of force against Iran.

The Risk of War: Everyday Sociality in the Republic of Macedonia

October 18, 2012 // 10:00am — 11:00am
Vasiliki Neofotistos discusses her recently released book, "The Risk of War: Everyday Sociality in the Republic of Macedonia," focusing on the ways middle- and working-class Albanian and Macedonian noncombatants in Macedonia's capital city, Skopje, responded to disruptive and threatening changes in social structure during the 2001 armed conflict.

POSTPONED-- Ukraine: Models of Development and Narratives of National Identity

October 29, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Twenty years ago, Ukraine gained its independence and started its path towards a free market economy and democratic governance. Where is it now after the leadership of four presidents and the Orange Revolution? Karina Korostelina, Associate Professor and Director, Program on History, Memory, and Conflict, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University, and former Regional Exchange Scholar, Kennan Institute, will exmaine a report that aims to create a comprehensive view on Ukraine after twenty years of independence by presenting prevailing conceptual narrative models of Ukraine as employed by Ukrainian and foreign experts and history teachers, main narratives of national identity, and the sources of a legitimacy crisis in Ukraine.

National Security vs. a Market Economy: A Cold War Dilemma

September 17, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The Cold War was an overarching reality for American presidents from Truman to George H.W. Bush. In fact, prosecuting the Cold War posed a profound dilemma for all presidents, but especially for Dwight D. Eisenhower. Wm. M. McClenahan, Jr. and Wm. H. Becker argue that economic policy was second only to national security in Ike’s mind. How was the United States to engage in the Cold War without undermining American political democracy and a market economy? Preserving the American way of life was to Eisenhower the preeminent objective of the Cold War.

The 1967 War and the Demise of Arab Nationalism

September 10, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The defeat of Egypt and Syria in the 1967 is often described as a deathblow to pan-Arabism, and it did indeed gravely undermine the regime of Gamal Abdel Nasser. Egyptians, Syrians and Palestinians had in fact already begun to shift towards narrower nation-state nationalism even before the 1967 war, which merely confirmed this reorientation.

Labor Protest and Political Change in Putin’s Russia

October 22, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Stephen Crowley, Professor of Politics and Chair, Russian & East European Studies, Oberlin College, and former Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute

Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979-1988

October 15, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
With its remarkable declassified documentation and oral testimony that bear directly on questions of U.S. policymaking with regard to the Iran-Iraq War, "Becoming Enemies" reveals much that was previously unknown about U.S. policy before, during, and after the war. The authors go beyond mere reportage to offer lessons regarding fundamental foreign policy challenges to the U.S. that transcend time and place.

The Role of the Diaspora in Shaping U.S. Policies Toward Africa

September 17, 2012 // 2:00pm — 4:00pm
With the Africa’s leverage in foreign affairs changing, Africans living outside of their home countries and communities of African descent have an unprecedented opportunity to affect the manner in which their host governments interact with these emerging states.

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