6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Opium Nation: Child Brides, Drug Lords, and One Woman's Journey Through Afghanistan

January 10, 2012 // 9:00am — 10:00am
Journalist and author Fariba Nawa discussed her recently published book, Opium Nation, as well as the role of women in the drug trade in Afghanistan and within Afghan society during the war led by the United States.

New Research on Climate and Conflict Links

December 19, 2011 // 9:00am — 11:45am
Experts discuss new and existing research that shows how climate change could potentially contribute to armed conflict or violent social unrest.

Marigold: The Lost Chance for Peace in Vietnam

January 24, 2012 // 3:30pm — 5:30pm
Marigold presents the in-depth story of one of the Vietnam War's last great mysteries: the secret Polish-Italian peace initiative, codenamed "Marigold," that sought to end the war, or at least to open direct talks between Washington and Hanoi, in 1966.

Landmark Kennan Biography Chronicles Complex Life of Early Cold Warrior

February 15, 2012 // 3:00pm — 4:30pm
Official biographer John Lewis Gaddis paints a fascinating and multidimensional portrait of George Kennan, the post-war diplomat who set forth containment doctrine, presaged the collapse of the Soviet Union, and, in later years, became an outspoken critic of U.S. foreign policy, including of the war in Vietnam. At the launch Wednesday of George F. Kennan: An American Life, Gaddis revealed the personality behind one of the 20th century’s great policy minds.

A Mosque in Germany: Nazis, Intelligence Services and the Rise of Political Islam in the West

March 01, 2012 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Stefan Meining, former Wilson Center public policy scholar and editor of Bayerischer Rundfunk, Bavaria's Public Broadcasting Service will discuss his latest book entitled which sheds new light on the history of the Islamic scene in Germany and how it was systematically nurtured by the intelligence services.

Delivering Solutions: Advancing Dialogue To Improve Maternal Health (Report Launch)

December 15, 2011 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
Join us on December 15 for the launch of "Delivering Solutions: Advancing Dialogue To Improve Maternal Health," which captures and synthesizes the recommendations of the Wilson Center's Maternal Health Dialogue Series.

Is Rio's Tough Love Strategy Against Violence Working?

December 13, 2011 // 9:00am — 11:30am
A conference to examine the effects of the Rio de Janeiro Pacifying Police Units (UPPs).

Government Leadership in Sustainability

December 14, 2011 // 3:00pm — 5:00pm
Opportunities among government and business to partner in support of sustainable design are vast and growing. Martha Johnson, GSA Administrator, will explore how $65 billion and 360 million square feet of federal real estate can become a zero environmental footprint that will reduce waste, support innovation, and boost efficiency.
Henry Hale at The Wilson Center

Russians May be Tiring of Putin Dominance, as Presidential Elections Approach

January 30, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
United Russia is weaker today partly because of changes the party made in its appointment of provincial governors during the Putin and Medvedev administrations, said Henry Hale, Director of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University. And although Putin is strongly favored, the outcome is still uncertain for Russia’s upcoming presidential vote, as support ebbs for the former president as voters tire of more than a decade of Putin’s dominance of national politics.
Peter Cheremushkin

Monument Wars across the Post-Soviet Space as a Conflict of Memories and Cultures

January 23, 2012 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
The destruction of the monuments of the Soviet past and a buildup of new monuments was supposed to be an indication of the new values that came to the post-Soviet societies after the collapse of the Soviet system. However, not everywhere and not always did it happen to be true. While in Poland the new monuments were accepted by the society in appreciative manner, in Ukraine, Estonia, and Georgia we watched the so-called phenomenon of “The War of the Monuments” when the removal of the old monuments and creation of the new ones was followed by protests and sometimes even riots. Around Russia many old monuments to Lenin remained at place while new monuments to the Russian tsars were erected. All of this basically resulted with a chaos of the views and attitudes and led to the devaluation of the monument as a symbol in the post-Soviet space.

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