6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Fairness and Transparency in Cameroon's Next Presidential Election

September 13, 2011 // 2:00pm — 3:30pm
A delegation of Cameroonian officials will present the government’s plans for the coming election as a backdrop to a discussion on how the international community can help ensure that democracy, human rights, the rule of law, and accountability are respected.
Sergey Markedonov

The Caucasus Region: Shaping a New Status Quo

October 03, 2011 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
The presentation is focused upon the transformation of the Caucasus region from one of periphery to one of the focal points of Eurasian, European, and Transatlantic security. The speaker examines roles played by the United States, Turkey, Iran, and the European Union (as well as by international organizations such as OSCE, NATO, and the UN) in the Caucasus since the dissolution of the USSR. The speaker will pay particular attention to Russia and its desire for playing an exclusive role in Caucasus geopolitics. The presentation stresses the new status quo that has emerged from the August War of 2008 (including a new political agenda for South Ossetia and Abkhazia, new Western strategies on engagement/non-recognition, the impact of the August War on Nagorno-Karabakh conflict resolution, and the Turkish-Armenian rapprochement).

Responding to the Economic Crisis: Austerity, Neoliberalism, and Beyond Neoliberalism

October 06, 2011 // 1:00pm — 3:00pm
Around the world, politicians, activists, scholars, and journalists describe the world as increasingly "neoliberal." For decades, populations worldwide have protested against neoliberal structural adjustment and austerity policies advocated by the IMF and World Bank. The protests in Greece were just a recent case of this worldwide critique. The riots in Britain have also been presented as the result of neoliberal policies. What do these protestors and commentators mean by neoliberalism? Why is it so important? What has caused neoliberalism? Which neoliberal trends do we see around the world? Is neoliberalism coming to an end? This panel will discuss the emergence of neoliberalism and its current state both worldwide and specifically in the former socialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

Theatre and the Holocaust in Romania: A dramatic reading of the Journals of Mihail Sebastian

September 27, 2011 // 4:00pm — 6:00pm
Romania officially condemned its involvement in the European Holocaust following the Elie Wiesel Commission Report of 2004. A first-person account of being Jewish in Bucharest under fascist dictatorship is given by playwright and novelist, Mihail Sebastian, in his diary. Adapted for the stage by David Auburn in 2004, Sebastian comes to life in this one-man show based on his journal. The panel discussion following the performance will be an opportunity for the panelists and audience to discuss anti-Semitism, memory, theatre, repression, creativity and Holocaust remembrance and education in Romania today. This event brings together partners from the Woodrow Wilson Center, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Romanian Embassy to the United States.

Crisis and Decisions in Cyprus: Euro-Contagion and Prospects for Reunification

September 21, 2011 // 10:00am — 11:00am
As Cyprus struggles to forgo being another player in the Eurozone debt calamity, many tough choices will have to be made in the coming weeks and months. Reshuffling the cabinet and tight fiscal policies could stiffen resolve behind austerity measures that, if adopted, could possibly see Cyprus through its economic crisis. For the first time in over half a century of the Republic’s history there is a call for early elections. These are certainly difficult times for Cyprus. With the coalition party, DIKO, pulling out and leaving AKEL the only party supporting the administration, the economy edging towards a bail-out, and the whole Mari fiasco explosion there is little room for any serious talks or remedies for successful negotiations with Turkish Cypriots. Can Christofias hold on to his post for the next 18-months of his presidency to regain voter confidence? Will Cyprus need an EU bail-out or can it pull through the economic crisis on its own? And in the wake of a politically feeble government and economy, what are the prospects for a settlement of the Cyprus problem?

Ethnocracy Instead of Democracy in Macedonia

September 12, 2011 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
On June 5, 2011, Macedonia held parliamentary elections. The outcome confirmed the fears of many observers, analysts, and democracy advocates that the ruling VMRO-DUI government coalition (both ultra-nationalist parties) will remain in power for the next four years with dire consequences for the future of Macedonia. Over the last four years, the government strongly protected nationalist projects and ethnic alliances, rather than the rule of law. The re-elected government has already shown disrespect for the rule of law, democracy, civil society, human rights, and freedom of speech in its earliest actions, which jeopardizes Macedonia’s attempt to accede to the European Union.

The National Conversation--9/11: The Next Ten Years

September 12, 2011 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
Top experts from Congress, the intelligence community, the media and academia joined together in an event moderated by the Washington Post's David Ignatius to examine how the threat is changing and how homeland security, military, and intelligence strategies should evolve to deal with it.

Homero Campa Butron on “Tres Episodios en Una Relación Tri-Lateral”

August 25, 2011 // 12:00pm — 2:00pm
The absence of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States has made Mexico a frequent intermediary when controversies arise between the two nations. At the same time, Mexico’s perceived closeness to the United States has, on occasion, unsettled the country’s historically warm relations with Havana, possibly compromising its position as an effective negotiator. Mexico, Cuba, and the United States have a “triangular” relationship, with Mexico frequently playing a fulcrum role that places it in the middle of important Cuba-U.S. issues, especially on migration, said Homero Campa Butrón, Public Policy Scholar In-Residence at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

Foreign Relations of the United States Series: Southern Africa, 1969-1976

September 14, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The Wilson Center's Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the Africa Program presents a panel discussion on the the newly released <i>Foreign Relations of the United States</i>, 1969–1976, Volume XXVIII, Southern Africa.

A Changing North Korea? A Trip Report

September 14, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:30pm
The North Korea International Documentation Project and the Korea Economic Institute of America will co-host a briefing on the recent trip of a group of U.S.-based scholars of modern Korean politics and history to North Korea.

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