6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Social Dimensions of REDD+: Current Practices and Challenges

October 21, 2011 // 9:00am — 5:00pm
Experts come together to discuss the social dimensions of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) as a climate mitigation scheme, with special focus on gender dynamics, effectiveness, and equality.

Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse

November 09, 2011 // 4:00pm — 5:15pm
In an upcoming Asia Program book launch of Shelley Rigger’s, "Why Taiwan Matters," Rigger explores Taiwan's importance to China, the United States, and the world.

Report Launch: The World’s Water, Vol. 7

October 18, 2011 // 10:00am — 12:00pm
Peter Gleick and colleagues find that more and more regions of the world, the United States included, may be reaching the point of “peak water.” To conserve this critical resource without harming the economy or public health, individuals are looking for new techniques in sustainable water management.

Legislating International Organization: The US Congress, the IMF, and the World Bank

October 25, 2011 // 9:00am — 10:30am
Covering the history of the IMF and World Bank from their origins, Lavelle shows that domestic political constituencies in advanced industrial states have always been important drivers of international financial institution policy. She focuses in particular on the U.S. Congress, tracing its long history of involvement with these institutions and showing how the Congress wields significant influence. The impact of 2008 financial crisis has focused American politics on the global role played by the IMF and World Bank.

Peasants Under Siege: The Collectivization of Romanian Agriculture, 1949-1962—On Creating Communist Authority in Everyday Life

November 16, 2011 // 12:00pm — 1:30pm
<b>Gail Kligman</b>, professor of sociology at UCLA and director of UCLA's Center for European and Eurasian Studies will discuss her latest book entitled <i>Peasants Under Siege</i> which explores the collectivization campaign in Romania (1949-1962) and its far-reaching effects.

Book Discussion: <i>Marooned in Moscow: The Story of an American Woman Imprisoned in Soviet Russia</i>

November 21, 2011 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Historian William Benton Whisenhunt will discuss the story and events behind the recently reissued memoir Marooned in Moscow, first published just months after Marguerite Harrison’s release from a Bolshevik prison in 1921. The book provides a fascinating account of Harrison’s entry into war-torn Russia in early 1920, first-person impressions of many in the top Soviet leadership, and her increasingly dangerous work as a journalist and spy, to say nothing of her work on behalf of prisoners, her two arrests, and her eventual ten-month-long imprisonment, including in the infamous Lubyanka prison. Whisenhunt will explain who Harrison was, how she got into this kind of work, and give examples of her extraordinary work at this critical time in Russian history.

Tolstoy and Russian Politics

November 28, 2011 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
This illustrated talk will explore why Tolstoy continues to be such a politically explosive figure in Russia today. As well as providing an overview of the writer’s often fraught relationship with the Tsarist regime, it will show how the Soviet government systematically sought to suppress his religious and philosophical legacy after 1917, and how the Kennan Institute played a crucial role in preserving it.

The Road Taken: Twenty Years after the Fall of the Soviet Union

November 16, 2011 // 10:00am — 4:00pm
The fall of the Soviet Union ushered in an era of dramatic change that saw a world power transform into a diverse region composed of 15 independent states. After 20 years of transition, how have the states of the former Soviet Union redefined their political, foreign policy, and social agendas?

Weimar Russia? Why Post-Soviet Authoritarianism Did Not Turn Fascist

November 15, 2011 // 3:30pm — 5:30pm
The speaker will compare inter-war Germany and post-communist Russia, and compare both nations’ very different political paths. Like in Weimar Germany, in today’s Russia, fascist actors are present, and nationalism is widespread in the population. The post-Soviet Russian situation is, however, distinct from the inter-war German one in that the party system is heavily manipulated and the third sector remains underdeveloped. Fascists have thus neither had a chance to use elections nor did they have the opportunity to penetrate civil society in order to build up political support. The continuing presence of a resolutely authoritarian, yet non-fascist "national leader" (Vladimir Putin) is a hindrance for the country to become a liberal democracy, but makes it, for the time being, also improbable that the Russian regime will transgress towards fascism.

Book Discussion: <i>The Orthodox Church and Russian Politics</i>

November 14, 2011 // 12:00pm — 1:00pm
Irina Papkova will present the major findings of her recent book, "The Orthodox Church and Russian Politics," which was jointly published by Oxford University Press and the Woodrow Wilson Center press in April 2011. The book examines church-state relations in post-Soviet Russia, and questions popular assumptions about the close nature of the relationship between the Orthodox church and the Putin regime in particular.

Pages