Australia and New Zealand Events

Australia and the Bomb Cover

Australia and the Bomb

January 28, 2015 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
Based on new archival material from the Australian National Archives and interviews with former and current senior defense officials, Christine M. Leah's new book explores the historical origins of the Asian nuclear landscape and their profound consequences for contemporary policy regarding US extended deterrence and proliferation by allies.

Privacy Vs Democracy: The Challenge for Japan and Australia

August 06, 2014 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Asia Program
Protecting privacy is as critical as information sharing. In a democracy, protecting information goes hand in hand with ensuring individual liberty, and the rapid development of digital technology has made the protection of privacy even more important.
Webcast

Arctic 2014: Who Gets a Voice and Why It Matters

May 21, 2014 // 9:00am12:00pm
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
Tensions over security, access, and environmental impacts in the Arctic are rising. While members of the Arctic Council (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, the United States) assert their established rights under new circumstances, an increasing number of non-Arctic states (including China, Korea, Japan, and Singapore) seek an active role in the region.

Australia's Historic Minimum Wage: A World History Approach

February 24, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Histories of the minimum wage are usually written within national analytic frameworks. Research in the New York Public Library on the first minimum wage, legislated in Victoria, Australia, in 1896, convinced historian Marilyn Lake that a world history approach was necessary, one that located this experiment in “state socialism” in the context of both the longue duree of imperial labor relations and encounters between the subjects of the British and Chinese empires in the new world of urban Melbourne.
Webcast

The Middle Kingdom Looks East, West, North and South: China’s Strategies on its Periphery

December 16, 2013 // 9:00am10:30am
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
China’s recent declaration of an air defense identification zone in the East China Sea and its territorial claims over 80% of the South China Sea are focusing renewed American attention on Chinese strategy. To understand China’s policies, deployments, and ambitions in the Western Pacific, we must analyze China’s attitudes toward all of its 14 border States and Pacific neighbors, and toward its near and more distant seas.
Webcast

Taking China Seriously: Replacing the Pivot With a Policy That Works

November 01, 2013 // 9:00am10:30am
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
Like other Asia-Pacific nations, Australia is hopeful that the regional interests of its treaty ally, the United States, and its most important trading partner, China, can be balanced to its own long-term advantage. Professor of Strategic Studies at Australian National University Hugh White has been a leading advocate for the view that Australia cannot hope to maintain a neutral distance between the U.S. and China; it will have to choose between them. His analysis, if correct, holds major implications not only for Australia, China, and the U.S., but for every Asia-Pacific nation.
Webcast

Why is Women's Leadership Critical? Addressing and Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls

March 07, 2013 // 3:00pm4:00pm
Global Women's Leadership Initiative
Speakers will discuss the global imperative of addressing the issue of violence against women and girls, highlighting the important theme of the Fifty-Seventh UN Commission on the Status of Women.
Webcast

Trade and Agriculture: Trans-Pacific Perspectives

February 13, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Asia Program
Agriculture has often been a stumbling block in free trade negotiations. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), often seen as the economic component of the Obama Administration’s “Asia pivot,” is no exception. Can Japan’s leadership, which has indicated a willingness to join the TPP, surmount resistance from its domestic agricultural lobby? Is the TPP attractive to countries like Korea, which has enthusiastically negotiated separate bilateral free trade agreements, most notably with the United States? What are the problems and opportunities in the agreement for American agricultural producers? How do nations like New Zealand, an agricultural powerhouse and original member of the TPP, view the negotiating positions of potential new members to the agreement?
Webcast

Conservation Initiatives in the Trans-Pacific Partnership

December 05, 2011 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Program on America and the Global Economy
Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement are making strides toward promoting environmental stewardship along with expanded trade. Join Ambassador Marantis for the discussion regarding progress in the TPP environment negotiations.

Australia in World Affairs 2006-2010: Middle Power Dreaming

October 04, 2011 // 12:00pm1:15pm
Asia Program
Former Wilson Center Australia Scholar James Cotton reflected on Australian foreign policy since 2006. Australian Ambassador Kim Beazley made introductory comments.

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