Bulgaria Events

Ethnonationalist Conflict in Postcommunist States

April 29, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Why do ethnonational conflicts reach different degrees of violence? Why does violence continue to reoccur even after strong international intervention for conflict-resolution and democratization? To answer these questions, Maria Koinova combines research on civil wars with the study of non-violent majority-minority disputes by examining 5 degrees of violence in three cases – Bulgaria, Macedonia, and Kosovo – over a 20-year period.

The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees and Minorities

May 07, 2013 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Global Europe Program
What drives a state's choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this pathbreaking work on the international politics of nation-building, Harris Mylonas argues that a state's nation-building policies toward non-core groups - any aggregation of individuals perceived as an unassimilated ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state - are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups.

Landscapes of Post-Modernity: Changes in the Built Fabric of Belgrade and Sofia since 1990

February 26, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Urban Sustainability Laboratory
Professor Sonia Hirt will present research on the recent physical changes in the built environment of Belgrade and Sofia.

Embracing Democracy in the Western Balkans

December 07, 2011 // 1:00pm2:00pm
Global Europe Program
"Embracing Democracy in the Western Balkans" explores the complex and challenging facets of state-building and nation-building in weak states with little democratic experience and daunting socio-economic problems.

Lost in Transition: Ethnographies of Everyday Life After Communism

October 20, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Lost in Transition tells of ordinary lives upended by the collapse of communism. Through ethnographic essays and short stories based on her experiences with Eastern Europe between 1989 and 2009, Kristen Ghodsee explains why it is that so many Eastern Europeans are nostalgic for the communist past. Ghodsee uses Bulgaria, the Eastern European nation where she has spent the most time, as a lens for exploring the broader transition from communism to democracy. She locates the growing nostalgia for the communist era in the disastrous, disorienting way that the transition was handled. The privatization process was contested and chaotic. A few well-connected foreigners and a new local class of oligarchs and criminals used the uncertainty of the transition process to take formerly state-owned assets for themselves. Ordinary people inevitably felt that they had been robbed. Many people lost their jobs just as the state social-support system disappeared. Lost in Transition portrays one of the most dramatic upheavals in modern history by describing the ways that it interrupted the rhythms of everyday lives, leaving confusion, frustration, and insecurity in its wake.

Islam at the EU Border: Muslim Minorities in Greece and Bulgaria

February 23, 2010 // 1:00pm2:30pm
Global Europe Program
Over the last 20 years, Bulgaria and Greece have pursued variable and divergent policies toward their Muslim minorities. During a brief period near the end of the Communist regime, Bulgaria forced Turks to assimilate. This policy was abandoned by the democratic government that took power in the 1990s. At the same time, Greece recognized its Muslim minority and facilitated the "Turkification" of its Muslim citizens throughout the 1980s, but then abandoned that policy by blocking minority rights in the 1990s. Harris Mylonas suggested that these policy shifts are commonly explained by assumptions or models that link minority treatment, regime type, ideology and leadership personalities. Rejecting these hypotheses, Mylonas argued that the structure of the international system was the most salient indicator influencing the treatment of Muslim minorities in both countries.

Banning Headscarves in Bulgaria: Reflections on the Debate over Religious Symbols in Public Schools

January 14, 2010 // 11:00am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
n Europe, the issue of headscarves has the power to expose a variety of social cleavages because it instantly provokes strong stances on matters such as national identity, religion, gender and human rights. This issue also reflects the way in which states set priorities within the broad category of human rights they are obliged to protect. Through her analysis of headscarf bans in Bulgarian schools, Kristen Ghodsee illustrated how a young postcommunist democracy has attempted to create a coherent policy on headscarves while balancing its commitments to multiple constituencies in the US, its fellow EU member states as well as its own diverse population.

Book Launch: Preying on the State: The Transformation of Bulgaria After 1989

January 31, 2008 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Global Europe Program
Venelin Ganev, Author and Professor of Political Science, Miami University

Bulgaria's First Year in the EU: Progress, Problems and Pessimism

December 19, 2007 // 11:00am12:00pm
Global Europe Program
John R. Lampe, Professor of History University of Maryland-College Park and WWICS Senior Scholar

Expanding the Eastern Frontier: Bulgaria, Romania and the EU

January 11, 2007 // 9:00am11:00am
Global Europe Program
Dr. Margarita Assenova, Executive Director of the Institute for New Democracies; Dr. Esther Brimmer, Deputy Director and Director of Research for the Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins University; Dr. Vladimir Tismaneanu, Professor of Government and Politics and Director of the Center for the Study of Post Communist Societies at the University of Maryland

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