Cold War Events

Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America

April 13, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America, the first systematic analysis of these conflicts among US allies, argues that bureaucratic interests, rather than international mistrust or diplomatic missteps, fueled protracted rivalry among allies. Author Christopher Darnton discusses four critical conflict-resolution initiatives between Argentina and Brazil from 1949 to 1980, based on research in both countries’ foreign ministry archives.

Murdering Patrice Lumumba

March 30, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
When Belgium relinquished control of the Belgian Congo in June 1960, a charismatic Patrice Lumumba became prime minister of the new Republic. Stability immediately broke down. The army mutinied, while Katanga Province seceded. Six months later Lumumba was murdered in Katanga; his undisputed rule as Congo’s first democratically elected leader had lasted ten weeks. Over fifty years later, the circumstances and symbolism of Lumumba’s assassination still troubled people around the world. Bruce Kuklick examines this defining event in postcolonial Africa. He reveals a tangled international political history in which many people—black and white, well-meaning and ruthless, African, European, and American—bear responsibility for the untimely death of a national dream.

Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations Between Washington and Havana

March 16, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
From John F. Kennedy’s offering of an olive branch to Fidel Castro after the missile crisis, to Henry Kissinger’s top secret quest for normalization, to Barack Obama’s promise of a “new approach,” authors of "Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations between Washington and Havana" William LeoGrande and Peter Kornbluh reveal a fifty-year record of dialogue and negotiations, both open and furtive.

Codename Nikolaus

March 16, 2015 // 1:00pm2:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Dr. Bodo Hechelhammer, chief historian of the BND, will deliver a lecture on the early years of the German intelligence service, introducing the American and German agents behind Germany’s Cold War spy operation.

"Empire" and "Invitations": Geir Lundestad’s Impact on Cold War Scholarship in Perspective

March 13, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
Geir Lundestad has been the Director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo and Secretary of the Norwegian Nobel Committee since 1990, retiring at the end of 2014 as director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute. Geir has made an enormous scholarly contribution to the field of history and supported many scholarly endeavors in the social sciences through the Nobel Institute fellowship and symposia program inaugurated under his leadership. Please join us for a symposium honoring Professor Geir Lundestad at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

The Danger of the Single Story: African Americans' Anticolonialism in the Early Cold War

March 09, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
After the onset of the Cold War, fierce anticolonialism emanated solely out of the black left, which paid dearly for opposing U.S. imperial policy. Meanwhile African American liberals, such as the NAACP, turned their backs on Asians and Africans determined to be free, colluded with the Truman administration’s support of European empires, and received, in return a few pieces of civil rights tokens. Carol Anderson will speak about her latest book, "Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960."

The Strategist: Brent Scowcroft and the Call of National Security

February 23, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
For four decades Brent Scowcroft has exerted a quiet, continued, and sometimes great influence over the conduct of US national security policy. Drawing on his new biography, The Strategist: Brent Scowcroft and the Call of National Security, Bartholomew Sparrow discusses how Scowcroft rose to become national security advisor under presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush.

Greece and EEC Membership: Was it a Mistake?

February 03, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Greece, the EEC and the Cold War, 1974-1979 by Eirini Karamouzi explores the history of the European Economic Community (EEC) in the turbulent decade of the 1970s with a focus on the Community’s response to the fall of the Greek dictatorship and the country’s application for EEC membership.

Poland's War on Radio Free Europe

February 02, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
For the Soviet bloc, the struggle against foreign radio was one of the principal fronts in the Cold War. Poland was at the fore-front of this war, relentlessly conducting, since the early 1950s until the collapse of the Communism, political, propaganda and intelligence operations against Radio Free Europe, regarded as the most dangerous enemy among “centers of foreign ideological subversion.” Poland`s War on Radio Free Europe, 1950-1989 is the first book in English to use the unique documents of Communist foreign intelligence at length.
Webcast

Marshall Plan for the Mind: The CIA Covert Book Program during the Cold War

January 15, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project

Pages