Cold War Events

'We are the true revolutionaries’: The Democratic Republic of Vietnam in the 1960s

February 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The history of relations between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the Soviet Union and other Socialist states during the Vietnam War is usually told as a story of solidarity and “proletarian internationalism.” But there was another side: while the North Vietnamese celebrated “friendly relations” with Moscow and East Berlin and happily accepted aid provided by the Soviet bloc, they were deeply distrustful of Moscow’s policy of “peaceful co-existence” and the influence of “revisionist culture.”

New Approaches to Trans-Atlantic Relations in the Early Cold War

January 06, 2014 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Giuliana Chamedes and Udi Greenberg explore how European agents utilized U.S. institutions and power in order to promote their own political agendas. The panel discussion will shed new light on the ideological and political forces that helped shape U.S. diplomacy in postwar Europe.
Webcast

Sino-Japanese Relations After the Cold War: Two Tigers Sharing a Mountain

December 12, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
When the Cold War ended, China and Japan faced each other as powers of nearly equal strength for the first time in their long history. Join author Michael Yahuda as he discusses his latest book, along with Japan Scholar Yoshihide Soeya in the latest event in our "Weighing the Rebalance" lecture series.

The Family Jewels Then and Now

October 28, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The famous 1970s investigations of the Central Intelligence Agency conducted by the Church Committee and others followed leaks of information from the intelligence agencies revealing activities that were illegal or abusive under the CIA’s charter. The CIA secretly compiled a document known as “The Family Jewels” detailing the abuses. This season of inquiry resulted in the intelligence oversight system that exists today. Now a fresh set of leaks confronts Americans, revealing widespread eavesdropping by the National Security Agency. What is the proper response to these revelations?

Indonesia and the World, 1965-66

October 21, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Pro-communist coup, military counter-coup, and subsequent mass killings in Indonesia in 1965/66 represent one of the major dramas of the Cold War. The powerful domestic impact of those events continues to haunt Indonesia until today, while the role of foreign actors remains largely hidden. Basing their talk on the first international academic conference held on this subject on Indonesian territory (in 2011), the speakers will introduce their edited book, Indonesia and the World, 1965-66, discuss international complicities, and address the current state of debate.

Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe

October 03, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Martin K. Dimitrov, Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, will speak on the puzzling durability of communist autocracies in Eastern Europe and Asia, the the longest-lasting type of non-democratic regime to emerge after World War I.

Latin America Encounters Nelson Rockefeller: Imagining the Gringo Patrón in 1969

September 30, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In 1969, Nelson Rockefeller embarked on four ill-fated diplomatic tours of Latin America that inspired violent clashes between the state and the street. Contemporary observers and subsequent scholars have dismissed Gov. Rockefeller's goodwill effort as an unmitigated failure. In this talk, Ernesto Capello explores recently released documents, including selections from the thousands of solicitations sent to Rockefeller by ordinary citizens, which demonstrate the need to reevaluate Rockefeller's Presidential Mission as a critical moment in the way Cold War Latin America imagined its neighbors to the north.

Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, 1954-1965

September 25, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Please join us for a book launch for Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, in which Pierre Asselin explores the communist path to war by way of new and largely inaccessible Vietnamese materials as well as French, British, Canadian, and American documents.

Brothers at War: The Unending Conflict in Korea

September 23, 2013 // 9:30am11:00am
North Korea International Documentation Project
Please join NKIDP for a book launch with Sheila Miyoshi Jager for Brothers at War: The Unending Conflict in Korea, a major historical account of the Korean War, its origins, and its evolving impact on the world.
Webcast

Enlarging the European Union

September 18, 2013 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
The first enlargement was one of the most divisive and politically charged events in the history of the present-day European Union. French opposition to British membership meant that London had to wait more than a decade at the Community's door. Other countries, including Denmark and Ireland, whose requests for membership were tied to the coat-tails of the British applications, had to endure a similar wait. Enlarging the European Union focuses on the early history of the EU and in particular the role played by the European Commission, an institution whose aim was to gain influence over the Community's agenda and to shape its policies, including the issue of enlargement. Enlarging the European Union explores the Commission's interaction with the member states and the applicant countries between the years 1961 and 1973 and also the Commission's attempts to gain and wield influence over the first enlargement round.

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