Cold War Events

Offsite Conference: Alliances and Borders in the Making and Unmaking of Regional Powers

July 07, 2011 // 9:30am1:00pm
Cold War International History Project
In cooperation with CWIHP, the Slavic Research Center at Hokkaido University is organizing a conference on Alliances and Borders in the Making and Unmaking of Regional Powers.
Webcast

Conventional Arms Control in Europe During the Cold War: New Insights From the Archives

June 16, 2011 // 9:30am11:00am
Cold War International History Project
Christoph Bluth, professor of international studies at the University of Leeds will discuss his on-going research on the history of the Mutual and Balanced Force Reductions (MBFR) negotiations.
Webcast

A Long Goodbye: The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan

May 26, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The current conflict in Afghanistan looms large in the collective consciousness of Americans. What has the United States achieved, and how will it withdraw without sacrificing those gains? Artemy Kalinovsky's latest book entitled A Long Goodbye: The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan discusses how the Soviet Union confronted these same questions in the 1980s, and how the USSR's nine-year struggle to extricate itself from Afghanistan and bring its troops home provides a sobering perspective on exit options in the region.
Webcast

Cold War on the Home Front: The Soft Power of Midcentury Design

May 18, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
Greg Castillo, Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley will discuss his latest book, an in-depth history of how domestic goods and environments were exploited on both sides of the Iron Curtain to promote either capitalism or socialism.
Webcast

The Invention of Ecocide

May 12, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
As the American public began to question the war in Vietnam, a group of scientists deeply concerned about their government's use of Agent Orange and other herbicides started a movement to ban what they called "ecocide." U.S. Deptartment of State Historian David Zierler in his latest book entitled The Invention of Ecocide, traces this movement, from the 1940s, when weed killer was developed in agricultural circles and when theories of counterinsurgency were studied by the military.
Webcast

The Soviet Bloc as a Project of Globalization

April 21, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Cold War International History Project
During a discussion held at the Wilson Center, Elidor Mëhilli argued that economic cooperation within the Soviet bloc should be viewed as a project of globalization characterized by intellectual and technical exchanges and implicit competition with the west. Mëhilli, a doctoral candidate in European and Eurasian history at Princeton University, focused on Albania, calling the small country in Southeast Europe an important laboratory for the "socialist experiment" and a useful case study to understand the nature of socialist exchange.
Webcast

Warsaw Pact: Wartime Statutes—Instruments of Soviet Control

April 05, 2011 // 1:00pm4:30pm
Cold War International History Project
A collection of recently declassified Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) documents demonstrates that in the early 1980s the U.S. government learned quickly of new Warsaw Pact planning instruments and accurately assessed the role that the Soviet Union's Warsaw Pact allies were expected to play in a conflict in Europe.
Webcast

Solidarity With Solidarity: Western European Trade Unions and the Polish Crisis, 1980-1982

March 11, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Cold War International History Project
On March 11, 2011 Idesbald Goddeeris will discuss his latest book which analyzes reaction to Solidarnosc in nine Western European countries and within the international trade union confederations.
Webcast

Russia's Cold War: From the October Revolution to the Fall of the Wall

March 10, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Cold War International History Project
In his latest book Jonathan Haslam makes the case that the Cold War was not stable, but was characterized by constant wars, near-wars, and political upheavals on both sides.
Webcast

Work in Progress Presentation: U.S. Policy Toward Trade Liberalization, Sino-American Economic Relations, and China's Road to "Reform and Opening," 1969-1976

February 17, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Cold War International History Project
On April 14th, 1971, President Richard Nixon announced an end to the U.S.-led embargo on the People's Republic of China, a step which marked the beginning of Sino-American economic normalization and a new direction for U.S. foreign policy despite the absence of diplomatic relations with Beijing. During a work in progress presentation, Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Dai Chaowu assessed the U.S. policy toward trade liberalization as an important element in Nixon's diplomacy and as a critical means of turning détente into a practical reality.

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