Cold War Events

Webcast

Celebrating the Legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan: The Launch of "Moynihan's Moment," a New Book by Gil Troy

April 04, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
McGill University Professor of History Gil Troy leads on expert panel on his latest book, "Moynihan's Moment: America's Fight Against Zionism as Racism" which explores the legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan.

The Power of Weak States in International Politics: Eastern Europe in the 20th Century

April 04, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
"Weak states can be both policy takers and, occasionally, policy makers," argues Laszlo Borhi in a presentation examining weak states in East Central Europe in the 20th century. Focusing on several case studies, Borhi looks at three periods: the aftermath of World War I and World War II and the post-1989 era.

The Third Side of the Cold War: Movement of the Non-aligned States, Yugoslavia and the World

April 03, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on the private document collections of two former Yugoslav ministers of foreign affairs, Tvrtko Jakovina renders an account of Tito's last years in office and the role Yugoslavia played as the leader of the Movement of the Non-aligned Countries from 1960s until 1990s.
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Explaining the Soviet ‘West’ and ‘Exotic’: Lithuanian and Georgian Writers

March 26, 2013 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Soviet writers were some of the most publicly recognizable intellectuals and were tasked by the state to transform society. The presentation outlined Georgian and Lithuanian writers, members of Writers’ Union, focusing on their participation in the establishment and the dynamics of ideas. The perspective of three generations in both countries reveals the rise of ethnic (local) interests and the disconnection of everyday-life from official goals. Both writers’ organizations expressed a clear character of localism (mestnichestvo), but the Georgian case illustrates more active participation at the central level while Lithuanian writers maintained a more peripheral and less active role in the druzhba narodov (“friendship of peoples”) narratives.

Environmental Film Festival: 'Vision: The PORTSfuture Projects'

March 22, 2013 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
The third film being hosted by the Wilson Center as part of this year's Environmental Film Festival is 'Vision: The PORTSfuture Projects,' on the decontamination and rehabilitation of one of the United States' first uranium enrichment facilities.
Webcast

Stalin’s Decision for War in Korea

March 18, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
At the end of the 1940s Joseph Stalin was forced to negotiate a new treaty of alliance with the victorious Chinese Communists. Mao Zedong won significant concessions from Stalin. The Soviet dictator was compelled to alter completely his policy for Korea.

1989 After 1989: Memory in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe

March 14, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
The eastern European revolutions of 1989 were a watershed in global history. Despite this, in the two decades since, their meaning has become a source of debate. While they have been promoted as a founding myth for a newly unified Europe, eastern Europeans have repeatedly represented them as a moment of betrayal, martyrdom, liberation, victory, disappointment, loss, colonization, or nostalgia.
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Stalin’s Curse: Battling for Communism in War and Cold War

March 05, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
"Exciting, deeply engaged, and shrewdly perceptive, Stalin's Curse is an unprecedented revelation of the sinister machinations of Stalin's Kremlin." Based on newly declassified archival materials author Robert Gellately offers a more clearly defined picture of what went on behind the scenes.
Podcast

The Arab Revolution

February 25, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Arab academics and activists call the uprisings that started in early 2011 across the Arab world “revolutions.” Yet the “Arab Revolution” is both similar and dissimilar to the French, Russian, and other great revolutions that molded the history of the Western world, as described by Crane Brinton in his classic, The Anatomy of Revolution.
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Boris Rabbot and the "Shestidesiatniki:" The Forgotten Liberals of the 1960s

February 25, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Boris Rabbot, a journalist and sociologist, was in the vanguard of the pre-perestroika "shestidesiatniks," influential intellectuals and party leaders who vigorously advocated a policy of liberalization within the Soviet system. His widow, Lynn Visson, Visiting Adjunct Professor and Visiting Associate, Monterey Graduate School Institute of Translation and Interpretation, retired UN interpreter and co-compiler of "Boris Rabbot: An Unheeded Voice of the 1960s," discussed how he and the intellectuals of his generation presaged the reformers of the Gorbachev era.

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