Communism Events

Eastern Europe’s Most Difficult Transition: Public Health and Demographic Policy, Two Decades after the Cold War

September 23, 2014 // 9:00am11:00am
Global Europe Program
Dr. Murray Feshbach was one of the first scholars to point out the devastating political and socio-economic effects of state communism’s failure to seriously address decaying public health and environmental conditions. His pioneering work remains relevant. More than two decades after the close of the Cold War, many health and demographic indicators in the former Warsaw-Pact states (including Russia) remain surprisingly inferior to those of the neighboring states of Western and Southern Europe.

The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book

September 08, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In The Zhivago Affair: The Kremlin, the CIA, and the Battle Over a Forbidden Book, Peter Finn and Petra Couvée bring readers intimately close to the charming, passionate, and complex artist that was Boris Pasternak. First to obtain CIA files providing concrete proof of the agency’s involvement, the authors give us a literary thriller that takes us back to a fascinating period of the Cold War—to a time when literature had the power to stir the world.

North Korean War Orphans in Transnational Educational Exchange

August 27, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
More than 100,000 children from both North and South Korea were orphaned during the Korean War. In 1953, the North Korean government dispatched 1,200 orphans to the People’s Republic of Poland to be educated at a boarding school transformed into an orphanage. The orphans were repatriated after six years, at the insistence of the North Korean government, as tensions between Pyongyang and its communist allies began to emerge. NKIDP Intern Intaek Hong examines the complicated process of how the orphans defined their identity based on their experience of interacting with their Polish teachers—who became like foster parents—and deploying their subjectivity in the process.

The Two Koreas and the Question of National Reunification, 1953-1960

April 11, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
This panel will explore the positions of the two Korea’s on the question of national reunification after the 1953 Korean War armistice until 1960, when Syngman Rhee was forced from power.

'We are the true revolutionaries’: The Democratic Republic of Vietnam in the 1960s

February 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The history of relations between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the Soviet Union and other Socialist states during the Vietnam War is usually told as a story of solidarity and “proletarian internationalism.” But there was another side: while the North Vietnamese celebrated “friendly relations” with Moscow and East Berlin and happily accepted aid provided by the Soviet bloc, they were deeply distrustful of Moscow’s policy of “peaceful co-existence” and the influence of “revisionist culture.”

Indonesia and the World, 1965-66

October 21, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Pro-communist coup, military counter-coup, and subsequent mass killings in Indonesia in 1965/66 represent one of the major dramas of the Cold War. The powerful domestic impact of those events continues to haunt Indonesia until today, while the role of foreign actors remains largely hidden. Basing their talk on the first international academic conference held on this subject on Indonesian territory (in 2011), the speakers will introduce their edited book, Indonesia and the World, 1965-66, discuss international complicities, and address the current state of debate.

Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe

October 03, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Martin K. Dimitrov, Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University, will speak on the puzzling durability of communist autocracies in Eastern Europe and Asia, the the longest-lasting type of non-democratic regime to emerge after World War I.

Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, 1954-1965

September 25, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Please join us for a book launch for Hanoi's Road to the Vietnam War, in which Pierre Asselin explores the communist path to war by way of new and largely inaccessible Vietnamese materials as well as French, British, Canadian, and American documents.

Brothers at War: The Unending Conflict in Korea

September 23, 2013 // 9:30am11:00am
North Korea International Documentation Project
Please join NKIDP for a book launch with Sheila Miyoshi Jager for Brothers at War: The Unending Conflict in Korea, a major historical account of the Korean War, its origins, and its evolving impact on the world.
Webcast

More than Just a Scourge: General de Gaulle and the Cold War

September 09, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
General de Gaulle is often remembered as the great scourge of the Western Alliance during the 1960s, the mercurial French President who launched a global and comprehensive challenge against the United States’ leadership of the Free World. But de Gaulle was driven by more than simply obstructionism or a desire to make life difficult for his American allies. Garret Martin will make the case that the General pursued an ambitious, if flawed, grand strategy during the 1960s through which he sought to overcome the Cold War bipolar order.

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