Democracy Events

Webcast

Book Launch--The Swing Vote: The Untapped Power of Independents

February 09, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Program on America and the Global Economy
In The Swing Vote: The Untapped Power of Independents, author Linda Killian looks beyond the polls and the headlines and talks with the frustrated citizens who are raising the alarm about the acute bi-polarity, special interest-influence, and gridlock in Congress, asking why Obama’s postpartisan presidency is anything but, and demanding realism, honest negotiation, and a sense of responsibility from their elected officials.

Georgian-South Ossetian Confidence Building Processes

February 06, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Dr. Susan Allen Nan will discuss the Georgian-South Ossetian relationship, including insights from the 14 Georgian-South Ossetian confidence building workshops she has convened over the past three years, the most recent of which was in January. The series of unofficial dialogues catalyze other confidence building measures and complement the Geneva Talks official process.
Webcast

Venezuela’s Primary Elections: What To Expect?

February 02, 2012 // 9:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
On Sunday, February 12, 2012, Venezuela held a primary election aimed at defining a single candidate to oppose President Hugo Chávez in presidential elections scheduled for October 7. In a rare showing of unity, opposition parties have agreed to select a single candidate to challenge President Chávez in the October elections, hoping to end more than a decade of his control of the presidency.

The Hungarian "Exception": Lessons in Political Economy

February 01, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Could Hungary's experience as a European Union member state be instructive? During the past decade the country's macroeconomic policies were characterized by sharp changes first under a socialist and later under a center-right government. George Kopits, Wilson Center Senior Scholar and former chair of Hungary's Fiscal Council, will assess the country's fiscal and monetary policies, as well as its overall economic performance and institution-building efforts against the backdrop of the deepening European financial crisis.
Webcast
Podcast

Two Decades after El Salvador’s Peace Accords: Current Challenges

January 30, 2012 // 9:00am11:30am
Latin American Program
In the twenty years since the signing of the Peace Accords, El Salvador has made impressive progress in expanding political and media freedoms, reforming the military and security forces, lowering rates of poverty and inequality, improving respect for human rights, and reforming electoral institutions. Today, however, El Salvador faces unprecedented security and economic challenges. An upsurge in transnational crime, including narcotics, weapons, and human trafficking, has intersected with longstanding problems of gang violence such that El Salvador suffers one of the highest homicide rates in the world. El Salvador’s economy continues to struggle amidst the global recession and weak economic recovery in the United States, the country’s largest export market.
Webcast
Podcast

Marigold: The Lost Chance for Peace in Vietnam

January 24, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
Marigold presents the in-depth story of one of the Vietnam War's last great mysteries: the secret Polish-Italian peace initiative, codenamed "Marigold," that sought to end the war, or at least to open direct talks between Washington and Hanoi, in 1966.

Monument Wars across the Post-Soviet Space as a Conflict of Memories and Cultures

January 23, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
The destruction of the monuments of the Soviet past and a buildup of new monuments was supposed to be an indication of the new values that came to the post-Soviet societies after the collapse of the Soviet system. However, not everywhere and not always did it happen to be true. While in Poland the new monuments were accepted by the society in appreciative manner, in Ukraine, Estonia, and Georgia we watched the so-called phenomenon of “The War of the Monuments” when the removal of the old monuments and creation of the new ones was followed by protests and sometimes even riots. Around Russia many old monuments to Lenin remained at place while new monuments to the Russian tsars were erected. All of this basically resulted with a chaos of the views and attitudes and led to the devaluation of the monument as a symbol in the post-Soviet space.
Webcast

A Discussion on Mexican Politics with Roderic Camp

January 20, 2012 // 10:00am12:00pm
Mexico Institute
The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the Hispanic Division, Library of Congress hosted the launch of two new books, Mexico: What Everyone Needs to Know, and Mexican Political Biographies, 1935-2009, by Roderic Camp.
Webcast

Mexico Today

January 13, 2012 // 9:00am1:45pm
Mexico Institute
A Seminar Convened by CIDAC and the Woodrow Wilson Center Mexico Institute

Civil Society and Election Campaigns: Negative and Positive Influences on the Vector of Russian Political Development

January 10, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
After the parliamentary elections on December 4th and public reactions to their outcome, the sociopolitical situation in Russia is changing rapidly. Are these processes irreversible, and what are their tendencies? What are the changes in correlation between civil society resources and political party resources, based on the election's results? The speaker will discuss the state’s “forms of public control,” how they influenced the last election campaign, and what new forms of control might emerge during the next presidential election in March 2012. She will also discuss the possible reputational risks for public and other organizations from attempted manipulation by the ruling powers during the election campaign.

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