Democracy Events

U.S. Should Isolate Phnom Penh: Cambodia's Opposition Leader

May 08, 2013 // 1:00pm2:00pm
Asia Program
The United States and European Union should isolate Cambodia from the international community to force it to push through political reform, according to the leader of the country’s leading opposition party. Pressure can be exerted by boycotting goods and cutting off aid to Phnom Penh, argued the Cambodia National Rescue Party’s leader Sam Rainsy in a presentation at the Wilson Center May 8.
Webcast

POSTPONED: Director's Forum: "Peace at Last: Closing the Chapter of Instability in the Balkans"

May 08, 2013 // 12:30pm1:30pm
Global Women's Leadership Initiative
Please note this event has been postponed.

The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees and Minorities

May 07, 2013 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Global Europe Program
What drives a state's choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this pathbreaking work on the international politics of nation-building, Harris Mylonas argues that a state's nation-building policies toward non-core groups - any aggregation of individuals perceived as an unassimilated ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state - are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups.
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Why Did Russia Let the Republics Go? Revisiting the Fall of the USSR

April 29, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Few people expected the USSR to fall apart as it did, without a major bloodshed. Serhii Plokhii, Mykhailo Hrushevsky Professor of Ukrainian History, Harvard University, attempts to answer the question of why Russia of Boris Yeltsin did not follow into the footsteps of Serbia of Slobodan Milosevic, by examining the decisions made by Boris Yeltsin and his advisors in the late summer and fall of 1991.

A Briefing on the Niger Delta: Where Things Stand

April 26, 2013 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Africa Program
Contrary to the deadly and deeply troubling situation in northern Nigeria and parts of the Middle Belt, ongoing insecurity, abductions, and politically-motivated violence in the oil-producing Niger Delta, a hotbed of unrest and instability just a few years ago, seems to be abating.

Justice Interrupted: The Struggle for Constitutional Government in the Middle East

April 23, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
The Arab Spring uprisings of 2011 were often portrayed in the media as a dawn of democracy in the region. But the revolutionaries were—and saw themselves as—heirs to a centuries-long struggle for just government and the rule of law, a struggle obstructed by local elites as well as the interventions of foreign powers. Thompson uncovers the deep roots of liberal constitutionalism in the Middle East through the remarkable stories of those who fought against poverty, tyranny, and foreign rule.
Webcast

Israel’s New Government: New Faces, Same Policies?

April 12, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Most articles and op-eds published recently on the recent Israeli election deal with the election results, the changing balance of power in Israel, and the diminishing support for Prime Minister Netanyahu. Peri presents an analysis of the deeper political changes, social trends, and cultural transformations that have long-term significance for Israeli society and politics. These include the emergence of a new, “fourth generation” of political leaders; the generational upheaval in the Israeli electorate; and the “religionization” of Israeli collective identity. Peri examines the implications of these trends for Israeli policies concerning the Middle East conflict.
Webcast

Smart Power for North Korea: U.S. Policy Options and North Korea's Foreign Policy Priorities

April 09, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Asia Program
North Korea’s nuclear efforts pose a serious threat to the region and to international security. Yet efforts to curb North Korea’s nuclear capabilities to date have failed. North Korea’s foreign policy objectives have evolved over the years, with a shift toward military control that encourages militarized solutions to political problems at home and abroad. The massive economic changes of the past 25 years mean that life chances for all North Koreans are frequently determined by how well they can make use of market opportunities. What impact does this have on North Korean foreign policy? Are the risks of war on the rise as the possibilities for a peaceful resolution to the North-South conflict decrease? What would a smart power-based foreign policy to North Korea look like?
Webcast

Historical Perspective on the Arab Spring

April 08, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In the Middle East, a parallel pattern can be seen in the history of the first Middle Eastern constitutional revolutions in the political movements of the 1870s. What does an examination of the role of constitutionalism in the Arab revolutions of 1923-2011 reveal about prospects for constitutional governments in the Middle East?
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Protests, Flash Mobs, and #Occupy: Are Soviet Successor States Breaking away from the Spell of Civic Apathy?

April 08, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Building on her recent research into different forms of civic activism in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, Kateryna Pishchikova, Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy, analyzed a range of recent civic initiatives in those countries and put them in the broader context of more than two decades of uncertain political transformation.

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