Democratic Transition Events

How Turkey’s Islamists Fell out of love with Iran: The Near Future of Turkish-Iranian Relations

April 23, 2013 // 3:00pm4:00pm
Global Europe Program
After the 1979 revolution, Iran’s Islamist regime emerged as the clear anti-thesis of a secular Turkey and two countries’ relationship was only sustained by political Islamists on both sides. According to Akin Unver, this 1979-2010 Islamist connection is also being reversed by the sectarian faultlines unearthed by the Arab Spring. Iran’s rapid fall from grace with Turkish Islamists is one of the most important recent structural shifts in the Middle East, Unver suggests. Such a break is far from marginal and yields several important points for consideration.

Justice Interrupted: The Struggle for Constitutional Government in the Middle East

April 23, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
The Arab Spring uprisings of 2011 were often portrayed in the media as a dawn of democracy in the region. But the revolutionaries were—and saw themselves as—heirs to a centuries-long struggle for just government and the rule of law, a struggle obstructed by local elites as well as the interventions of foreign powers. Thompson uncovers the deep roots of liberal constitutionalism in the Middle East through the remarkable stories of those who fought against poverty, tyranny, and foreign rule.
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Protests, Flash Mobs, and #Occupy: Are Soviet Successor States Breaking away from the Spell of Civic Apathy?

April 08, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Building on her recent research into different forms of civic activism in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, Kateryna Pishchikova, Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy, analyzed a range of recent civic initiatives in those countries and put them in the broader context of more than two decades of uncertain political transformation.
Webcast

Celebrating the Legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan: The Launch of "Moynihan's Moment," a New Book by Gil Troy

April 04, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
McGill University Professor of History Gil Troy leads on expert panel on his latest book, "Moynihan's Moment: America's Fight Against Zionism as Racism" which explores the legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan.
Webcast

Arab Uprisings and Mass Politics: Constraints, Change, Uncertainty

March 29, 2013 // 10:00am11:30am
Middle East Program
Laurie Brand discusses her paper on the effect of regional transitions on Arab foreign policy using Egypt and Jordan as case studies.

The Sandzak Divided: Language and Identity Politics on Either Side of the New Serbian/Montenegrin Border

March 28, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
In the post-Yugoslav context, members of these Muslim communities have largely self-identified as Bosniaks, an ethnic/national term that gained prominence among Bosnian Muslims in the period immediately following the dissolution of Yugoslavia in 1991 and the outbreak of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. While language policies in this region were centrally formulated in the joint state, with the dissolution of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro in 2006, the two halves of the Sandžak experienced divergent language policies. In his presentation, Robert Greenberg, professor of linguistics at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, argues that the division of the Sandžak may have been a catalyst for destabilizing and radicalized forces to emerge in the years following the formal Serbia/Montenegro split.
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Russian Citizenship: From Empire to Soviet Union

March 25, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
"Russian Citizenship" is the first book to trace the Russian state’s citizenship policy throughout its history. Focusing on the period from the mid-nineteenth century to the consolidation of Stalin’s power in the 1930s, Eric Lohr considers whom the state counted among its citizens and whom it took pains to exclude. His research reveals that the Russian attitude toward citizenship was less xenophobic and isolationist and more similar to European attitudes than has been previously thought—until the drive toward autarky after 1914 eventually sealed the state off and set it apart.
Webcast
Podcast

Democracy in Latin America: Analysis and Policy Implications

March 22, 2013 // 9:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
This event is co-sponsored with the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, University of Notre Dame.
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Exiting Anarchy: Militia Politics after the Post-Soviet Wars

March 21, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Jesse Driscoll, Academy Scholar, Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Harvard University, and Assistant Professor of Political Science, School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California at San Diego discussed his forthcoming book on how political order emerged in Tajikistan and Georgia after the violent chaos of the Soviet collapse.
Webcast

Preparing for Election Day in Pakistan: What Constitutes Credibility?

March 14, 2013 // 2:30pm4:00pm
Asia Program
Two experts step back from all the talk about surveys, polling, and favorites to discuss broader issues of credibility and institutions, among other topics, in Pakistan's upcoming elections.

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