Democratic Transition Events

photo by Mona Youssef

Beyond Dichotomy: Building a New Egypt

September 26, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Over the past year in Egypt, Margot Badran has witnessed how in a society sharply polarized for several decades the old categories of ‘the religious’ and ‘the secular’ have become increasingly meaningless as descriptors of clearly marked social identity yet also retain considerable political force. She discusses how sustained dichotmization impedes the construction of a new Egypt drawing upon her observations in both the capital and the provinces.
Photo by Mona Youssef

The Middle East in Transition: A Lebanese Perspective

September 21, 2012 // 12:00pm1:15pm
Middle East Program
The region is in the midst of a historic but turbulent transition. Almost all the region's fault lines are in flux. Shia versus Sunnis; Iran versus its many enemies; militant Islam versus moderate Islam; and the Syrian dictatorship versus its own people, let alone the perennial Israel versus the Palestinians. While these are regional fault lines, nowhere do they all collide together the way they do in Lebanon - with potentially great ramifications for the country's security, its politics, and its future. Chatah will address these conflicts and related policy questions for Lebanon, for the rest of the region, and for the United States.
Photo by Mona Youssef
Webcast

Saudi Arabia's Race Against Time

September 17, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Ottaway reports on the state of the Saudi kingdom based on his latest trip to Saudi Arabia.
Photo courtesy of: El-Nacional.com
Webcast
Podcast

Venezuela’s Presidential Elections 2012: Report of a Study Mission

September 07, 2012 // 9:00am11:30am
Latin American Program
Join the Latin American Program and International IDEA to discuss Venezuela's political future before the upcoming elections.
Webcast

A Conversation with Rudwan Dawod on his Incarceration in The Sudan

September 04, 2012 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Africa Program
Concerned for the future of his country, and dedicated to peace and democracy, Rudwan attended a peaceful demonstration on July 3rd to protest the Sudanese government’s recent austerity policies, and ongoing violence in the Nuba Mountains, Blue Nile, and Darfur. Subsequently, Rudwan was arrested, beaten until unconscious, tortured, charged with terrorism, and retained in prison for 44 days.
Webcast
Podcast

The Role of the Opposition in Meeting Nigeria’s Challenges

August 22, 2012 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Africa Program
Nigeria, a country of vast potential, is beset with enormous development challenges regarding governance, economic growth, and security.
Webcast
Podcast

Understanding and Responding to Attacks on Civil Society: The Roles of Politics and Law

August 14, 2012 // 9:30am11:00am
Africa Program
It is crucial for the international community to understand the implications of attacks on civil society for the development of democratic governance in these countries and, more importantly, to identify effective ways to respond to them.
Webcast
Podcast

Syria: What Lies Ahead

July 16, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
What if the Syrian opposition doesn't unite? Are the Alawites preparing for a separate state? Are the Kurds? What is the likely impact of a Sunni dominated Syrian government on the region? How much U.S. intervention is the right amount? Landis discusses these questions and the future of Syria.
Webcast
Podcast

South Africa: Transforming Tomorrow

June 26, 2012 // 1:15pm5:40pm
Africa Program
As part of the Embassy of South Africa’s “South Africa 2012,” the South Africa-Washington International Program (SAWIP) & the Wilson Center Present: South Africa: The Future Ahead.

Revolution and Rebirth: The View from Alexandria, Egypt

June 26, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
Ismail Serageldin discusses how Egypt’s Bibliotheca Alexandrina (BA) saw the rebirth of an ancient institution of scholarship and learning. For eight years in Mubarak’s Egypt, the BA was a beacon for freedom and enlightenment, and helped promote the deep currents that fed Egypt’s revolution in the Arab Spring. Yet its own values and commitments were and are being put to the test as the Egyptian people challenge authority and take charge of their own destiny.

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