History Events

Webcast

Twenty Years of Independence: Reflections on Freedom and Democracy

November 16, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
This Director's Forum will feature Martin Bútora, Honorary President of the Institute for Public Affairs in Bratislava and former Ambassador of the Slovak Republic to the United States (1999-2003). Ambassador Bútora will deliver the keynote address at the 13th annual Czech and Slovak Freedom Lecture.
Webcast

Understanding Chinese Nationalism: Historical Memory in Chinese Politics and Foreign Relations

November 13, 2012 // 9:00am10:15am
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
How did the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) not only survive but also regain the support of many Chinese citizens after the Tiananmen Square crackdown of 1989? Why has popular domestic sentiment turned toward anti-Western nationalism despite the anti-dictatorship democratic movements of the 1980s? Why is there a higher possibility that the new Beijing leadership will adopt a more nationalistic foreign policy in response to domestic nationalism in spite of China benefiting most from globalization?
Webcast

“Woman-Made Women: American Designers, Taste, and Mid-Century Culture”

November 07, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Global Women's Leadership Initiative
Join us for a lecture in the series "The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History" with Dr. Kathy Peiss
Webcast

Radio Free Europe and the CIA Partnership

November 05, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty became successful substitutes for free media in the Soviet bloc during the Cold War. This seminar talk will draw on CIA and Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty archives to trace the history of their first two decades. It will address three questions: What was the evolving reason for CIA covert funding? What was the relationship between CIA and the Radios? Why did the Radios prove to be one of the most important and successful policy instruments of the United States during the Cold War?

POSTPONED--The Worlds of Joseph Conrad

October 29, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What were the historical circumstances behind Joseph Conrad's history of the fin-de-siècle as a turning point in international history? In his novels Heart of Darkness (1899), Lord Jim (1900), Nostromo (1904), and The Secret Agent (1907)--each set on a different continent, each engaging with a different imperial power, each anchored in real-world incidents and in his own personal experience--Conrad anticipated some of the defining themes of the twentieth century.

Marriage 'Crisis' in the Jazz Age

October 24, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Global Women's Leadership Initiative
Join us for a lecture in the series "The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History" with Dr. Nancy Cott.
Webcast

Cuban Missile Crisis: Nuclear Order of Battle

October 24, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
Robert S. Norris, senior fellow for nuclear policy at the Federation of American Scientists will lead a Wilson Center panel discussion on "Cuban Missile Crisis: The Nuclear Order of Battle." Joining him will be defense analyst and nuclear historian David A. Rosenberg. The event will take place during the 50th anniversary of the 13 day crisis.

Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis

October 23, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Historian presents a panel discussion, Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis.
Webcast

Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979-1988

October 15, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
With its remarkable declassified documentation and oral testimony that bear directly on questions of U.S. policymaking with regard to the Iran-Iraq War, "Becoming Enemies" reveals much that was previously unknown about U.S. policy before, during, and after the war. The authors go beyond mere reportage to offer lessons regarding fundamental foreign policy challenges to the U.S. that transcend time and place.
Webcast

Is the World More Dangerous 50 years after the Cuban Missile Crisis?

October 15, 2012 // 1:00pm2:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In October the world will observe the 50th Anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, when the world came closest to nuclear war. In this Wilson Center National Conversation, panelists will discuss the Cuban Missile Crisis and the lessons that it holds in the context of the upcoming US presidential election.

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