History Events

Webcast

Japan's Peace Constitution at 65: Time for a Change?

September 22, 2011 // 3:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
An event examining efforts to revise and reinterpret the Japanese constitution's "war renouncing" Article 9.

Off-site Event: Report on a Visit to North Korea

September 22, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
The North Korea International Documentation Project in collaboration with the Weatherhead East Asian Institute presents "Report on a Visit to North Korea" with Charles Armstrong, Abraham Kim and James Person.
Webcast

“Rogue States” and the United States: An Historical Perspective

September 19, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What are the implications for the ongoing challenges to international order and American security posed by states such as Iran and North Korea? How can states that egregiously violate international norms be reintegrated into the “family” or “community” of nations?
Webcast

Foreign Relations of the United States Series: Southern Africa, 1969-1976

September 14, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The Wilson Center's Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the Africa Program presents a panel discussion on the the newly released Foreign Relations of the United States, 1969–1976, Volume XXVIII, Southern Africa.
Webcast

Border Security Challenges After 9/11: A Conversation With Three Commissioners of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

September 09, 2011 // 11:00am12:00pm
International Security Studies
Commissioner Alan Bersin of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CPB) joins former commissioners Robert Bonner and Ralph Basham in a discussion of border security since 9/11. This roundtable, facilitated by Professor Bruce Hoffman of Georgetown University, will examine how the federal government consolidated border security into one CBP in 2003 and how threats to the nation’s homeland have evolved over the last decade.

The Phenomenon of Solidarity: Pictures From the History of Poland, 1980-1981

August 29, 2011 // 5:00pm7:00pm
Cold War International History Project
The Phenomenon of Solidarity commemorates the 30th anniversary of the founding of the movement, and highlights formative moments in its history.
Webcast

Book Discussion: After Leaning to One Side: China and Its Allies in the Cold War

August 15, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Shen Zhihua will discuss his latest book, After Leaning to One Side: China and Its Allies in the Cold War.
Webcast

The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers

July 13, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Wars of Afghanistan offers perspective on how Afghanistan's history as a "shatter zone" for foreign invaders and its tribal society have shaped the modern Afghan narrative. It brings to life the misinformed secret operations by foreign intelligence agencies, including the Soviet NKVD and KGB, the Pakistani ISI, and the CIA.
Webcast

Brazil, Argentina, and the Road to the NPT

June 15, 2011 // 4:30pm6:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
For several decades Argentina and Brazil sought to develop their own indigenous nuclear programs and tried to resist the expansion of the global non-proliferation regime. Deep mutual suspicion coupled with status competition colored their relationship and their standing in the face of the major nuclear powers. Starting in the 1980s, however, a range of mechanisms led to an emerging system of mutual inspections that transformed geopolitics in South America, defused threat perceptions, helped the civilian leadership extricate the military from the nuclear programs, and paved the way for entry into the NPT.
Webcast

Death and Redemption: The Gulag and the Shaping of Soviet Society

May 19, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Death and Redemption examines the Gulag's role defining the border between reintegration into society and permanent removal through death. Steven Barnes focuses on Kazakhstan's Karaganda region, a location that hosted a number of Soviet detention institutions, and suggests that the Gulag should be construed as a "corrective facility," which gave its occupants a final chance to prove themselves through forced labor. Those who succeeded returned home after years of brutal, forced labor; the ones who "failed" died. Barnes traces the evolution of the Gulag from its origins post-1917, immediately following the Russian Revolution up to the death of Stalin in 1953. The author draws on recently declassified materials from Russia and Kazakhstan, including memoirs of survivors, to show that the Gulag as an institution remained closely linked to the Soviet idea of creating an utopian socialist society.

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