History Events

Webcast

From Historian to Incidental Diplomat: The Writing of History Before and After Participating in its Making

May 18, 2011 // 2:30pm3:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Former deputy foreign minister and negotiator for Armenia Gerard J. Libaridian will present a talk entitled From Historian to Incidental Diplomat: The Writing of History Before and After Participating in its Making drawing extensively on his own experience and revelations as a diplomat for Armenia and as a historian of Armenian foreign policy.
James Meyer
Webcast

Muslims and the State in Late Imperial Russia and Today

May 16, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Through analyzing the status of Muslim communities in late Imperial Russia, James Meyer, Assistant Professor, Department of History and Philosophy, Montana State University, and Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson Center, examined the current state of - and challenges facing - Muslim culture in modern-day Russia.
Webcast

The Invention of Ecocide

May 12, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
As the American public began to question the war in Vietnam, a group of scientists deeply concerned about their government's use of Agent Orange and other herbicides started a movement to ban what they called "ecocide." U.S. Deptartment of State Historian David Zierler in his latest book entitled The Invention of Ecocide, traces this movement, from the 1940s, when weed killer was developed in agricultural circles and when theories of counterinsurgency were studied by the military.
Webcast

South Africa and the End of Apartheid

May 02, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Upon his release from prison, Nelson Mandela led the crowd in a rousing chant of the old resistance phrase, "Come Back Africa." Now, twenty years later, we may begin to ask what kind of Africa is coming back. The question can be addressed by looking beyond the struggle of the African National Congress to focus on ordinary people's mobilizations in the past. A history of generational conflict, chiefship, and trans-ethnic solidarity continues to be felt in the present.

The Bush Administration's Decision for War in Iraq, 2003

April 27, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Melvyn P. Leffler will review prevailing interpretations and suggest how his current research may refine our understanding of the decision to intervene militarily in Iraq in 2003.
Webcast

America's International Civil War

April 25, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
While the military contest between North and South dragged on inconclusively over four years, an equally crucial contest of diplomacy, ideology, and propaganda was waged abroad. Powerful economic interests and anti-democratic sympathies favored the South. On the other hand there was a reservoir of popular good will toward the "Great Republic" and widespread antipathy toward human slavery. Each side sought to shape foreign debate over the "American Question." The Union won only when it learned to align its cause with what foreigners understood to be an ongoing international struggle for liberty, equality, and self-government.
Webcast

The Left: Does It Have a Future? Global Perspectives

April 25, 2011 // 1:30pm3:30pm
United States Studies
Does the left have a future? This was the question posed by US Studies during its April 25 panel discussion of the prospects for progressive movements around the world.
Olga Kazmina

The Russian Orthodox Church in the Post-Soviet Period: Challenges and Responses

April 25, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Olga Kazmina, Professor, Department of Ethnology, Moscow State University; Visiting Fulbright Scholar, Department of Religion, Emory University; and Former Regional Exchange Scholar, Kennan Institute
Webcast

Book Discussion: "Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams"

April 21, 2011 // 4:30pm6:00pm
Kennan Institute
In discussing his new book, "Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams," Charles King, Professor of International Affairs and Government at Georgetown University and former Title VIII-Supported Short-Term Scholar, Kennan Institute, analyzed the vibrant city of Odessa, and the destruction of its Jewish population.
Webcast

Civil Military Relations: At the Heart of Military History

April 11, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Military historians of the modern era have often neglected the relationship between the armed forces and the state, particularly its effect on outcomes in war and military policy and activity during peacetime. Yet some of the more famous writing on military theory have emphasized the importance of the topic. Military historians of the United States, as the literature reveals, have only now begun to address the subject systematically and in depth.

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