History Events

Webcast

Kissinger's Realpolitik and American Exceptionalism

March 28, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Henry Kissinger is perhaps the most famous and most controversial American diplomat of the twentieth century. Much of the literature about him emphasizes his geopolitical approach to international relations, his European background, and his advocacy of Realpolitik. But to a large extent of his foreign policy was fundamentally shaped and conditioned by domestic politics. Kissinger ultimately failed to bring about a different approach to foreign policy, one moving beyond American exceptionalism and toward an understanding of the limits of power.
Webcast

Ruth Fischer: A Life For and Against Communism, 1895-1961

March 24, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Mario Kessler, associate professor at the University of Potsdam, Germany will discuss Ruth Fischer's political itinerary and attempt to explain why it went to such extremes – astonishing even in the ‘Age of Extremes.'
Webcast

The Russian Imperial Legacy—Stalin and the Outbreak of the War in the East: Barbarossa

March 21, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Few events in the history of the twentieth century are as controversial, politicized, and laden with emotion as is the launching of operation Barbarossa—the German Invasion of Russia. It has become a fertile ground for conspiracy theories and a subject of unending polemics. This presentation will discuss a vital but missing dimension: the subjugation of ideological premises to the everlasting Russian imperial legacy as the driving force behind Stalin's policies on the eve of operation Barbarossa.
Lorenzo Vidino
Webcast

Book Discussion: The New Muslim Brotherhood in the West

March 17, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
A discussion with author Lorenzo Vidino, visiting fellow at RAND Corporation
Webcast

The 'Good Occupation': Military Government in the American Imagination

March 14, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Military occupation has been a crucial dimension of U.S. foreign relations from the early nineteenth century to the present. The occupations of Germany and Japan in the wake of the Second World War generally were regarded positively. The occupation of Iraq, which initially met with some approbation, eventually tarnished the reputation of the George W. Bush administration. Wilson Center fellow Susan L. Carruthers will explain the transformation of public attitude.
Webcast

Rethinking the History of the French Welfare State

March 07, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
This seminar will delineate the French welfare state in long-term historical perspective and consider the multiple strands of tradition, institutions, and policies that contributed to its founding and development. It will link practices to successive political regimes and make comparisons between French and British welfare systems. What are the possible future directions of French welfare policy in view of past precedents and current conditions?

In Search of 'La Chose Franco-Arab'

February 28, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
From the eighteenth century until the present, the multitude of French-Arab relationships, positive or negative, constitute what one can call, according to the famous expression of Jacques Berque, "la chose franco-arabe" ("the French-Arab thing"). This seminar will define its history and consequently its nature—and what its future might be.
Webcast

From 1910 to 2010: Understanding the Causes and Consequences of Youth and Adult Grievances that Drive the Second Arab Revolt

February 17, 2011 // 11:00am12:00pm
Middle East Program
Rami Khouri, Former Public Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center; Director, Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs, American University of Beirut; and Visiting Scholar, Fares Center, Tufts University
Webcast

Churchill's Cold War Revisited

February 14, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Winston Churchill's 1946 "iron curtain" speech was the opening shot in the Cold War for Stalin, Khrushchev, and most other Soviet leaders. Churchill's summit diplomacy of the years 1953–55, however, called for German unification on the basis of neutrality and the peaceful end of the East-West conflict. How can this apparent contradiction be explained? What were Churchill's motives? Klaus Larres revisits these issues and argues that Churchill's policies were coherent and made contributions toward possible solutions in a creative way.
Webcast

Territory, Statehood, and Sovereignty from Westphalia to Globalization

February 07, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The possession of territory or bounded political space has been crucial for the modern state, but historians and political analysts have left its properties unexamined. How have the premises and practices of territoriality changed from the seventeenth century to our own era?

Pages