History Events

'We are the true revolutionaries’: The Democratic Republic of Vietnam in the 1960s

February 03, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The history of relations between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the Soviet Union and other Socialist states during the Vietnam War is usually told as a story of solidarity and “proletarian internationalism.” But there was another side: while the North Vietnamese celebrated “friendly relations” with Moscow and East Berlin and happily accepted aid provided by the Soviet bloc, they were deeply distrustful of Moscow’s policy of “peaceful co-existence” and the influence of “revisionist culture.”

The Past and Future of the Foreign Relations Series

January 27, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In more than 450 volumes produced since its inception in 1861, the U.S. Department of State’s Foreign Relations of the United States series presents the official documentary historical record of major U.S. foreign policy decisions and significant diplomatic activity. State Department Historian Stephen P. Randolph will discuss the series’ past as well as the many challenges facing it today, not least technological developments that threaten the future of the bound volumes familiar to generations of diplomats and historians.

Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane

January 14, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Lost Enlightenment recounts how, between the years 800 and 1200, Central Asia led the world in trade and economic development, the size and sophistication of its cities, the refinement of its arts, and, above all, in the advancement of knowledge in many fields. Lost Enlightenment chronicles this forgotten age of achievement, seeks to explain its rise, and explores the competing theories about the cause of its eventual demise. Informed by the latest scholarship yet written in a lively and accessible style, this is a book that will surprise general readers and specialists alike.

People Out of Place: A Constitutional History of the Long 1960s

January 13, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Vagrancy laws made it a crime to be idle and poor, or dissolute, or to wander about without any purpose. African Americans and other civil rights activists, communists, labor union activists, poor people, Beats and hippies, gay men and lesbians, women, Vietnam War protestors and student activists, and young, urban minority men all contested their constitutionality. In 1971 and 1972, the Supreme Court struck them down. Risa Goluboff shows how this changing constitutional status of vagrancy laws was part and parcel of the larger social transformations of the long 1960s.
Webcast

Sino-Japanese Relations After the Cold War: Two Tigers Sharing a Mountain

December 12, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
When the Cold War ended, China and Japan faced each other as powers of nearly equal strength for the first time in their long history. Join author Michael Yahuda as he discusses his latest book, along with Japan Scholar Yoshihide Soeya in the latest event in our "Weighing the Rebalance" lecture series.

The Myth of Race and Its Many Political Uses, from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America

December 09, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In this presentation, Jacqueline Jones will focus upon the different uses of the myth of race in specific times and places. The life-stories of a Maryland slave murdered by his master; a fugitive in Revolutionary South Carolina; a savvy businesswoman in antebellum Providence; a principled Republican in post-Civil War Savannah; a school principal in segregationist Mississippi; and a Marxist autoworker in industrial Detroit all suggest the shifting, contradictory nature of racial mythologies from the seventeenth century to the present.
Webcast
Podcast

Political Dispossession of Roma in Contemporary Europe

December 05, 2013 // 2:00pm6:00pm
Global Europe Program
The Global Europe Program is pleased to host the 9th Annual Ion Ratiu Democracy Award Workshop - "Democracy, Human Rights, Entrenched Poverty: Political Dispossession of Roma in Contemporary Europe," featuring Dr. Angela Kocze, leading Hungarian Roma rights activist and a visiting assistant professor at Wake Forest University, NC.

Yellow and Gold: Chinese Gold Miners and the ‘Chinese Question’ in Pacific-World Settler Colonies, 1848-1910

December 02, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Mae Ngai will address two transpacific circulations in the late-19th century — the movement of Chinese to the gold rushes of the Pacific world, including the forms of work and social organization that they brought with them from southern China and southeast Asia and their local adaptions; and the circulation and evolution of anti-Chinese racial politics from North America to Australia to South Africa, which led to restrictive and exclusionary measures.

Access to Capital after the Poor People’s Campaign

November 21, 2013 // 2:30pm4:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
As we mark the 45th Anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Poor People’s Campaign, we must consider the mixed legacy of one element of their platform, the demand that access to capital be expanded.

WordPower: Written Constitutions and British Worlds

November 18, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The proliferation of new written constitutions after 1787 presented British governments with both opportunities and challenges. By way of its empire and international heft – and increasingly in order to compete with the US – the UK came to draft and influence more constitutions in more parts of the world than any other power.

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