History Events

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Illuminating the Kazakh Nomadic Culture: American Travelers (1870-1920)

May 28, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Kazakhstan is rich in natural resources and ancient, unique cultures that have long attracted attention of Western travelers. Early American travelers made significant contributions in preserving Kazakhstan’s history as witnesses to its nomadic culture and through their photographs, drawings, and diaries. Saule Satayeva includes Kennan Institute namesake George Kennan who, together with American painter George Frost, wrote evocative essays and created numerous drawings and photographs.
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Communism on Tomorrow Street: Mass Housing and Everyday Life after Stalin

May 20, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
This book examines how, beginning under Khrushchev in 1953, a generation of Soviet citizens moved from the overcrowded communal dwellings of the Stalin era to modern single-family apartments, later dubbed khrushchevka. Arguing that moving to a separate apartment allowed ordinary urban dwellers to experience Khrushchev’s thaw, Steven E. Harris fundamentally shifts interpretation of the thaw, conventionally understood as an elite phenomenon.
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Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

May 08, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Kate Brown presented "Plutopia", the first history of Richland, Washington and Ozersk, Russia, two communities developed in parallel by opposing nations at the height of the Cold War.

Capacity-Building and Low-Key Reintegration of North Korea into International Regimes

May 08, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
Realistically, is there still room for international civilian efforts to open up North Korea? During this event, Dr. Bernhard Seliger will consider the role international capacity-building efforts might play in this respect.

The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees and Minorities

May 07, 2013 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Global Europe Program
What drives a state's choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this pathbreaking work on the international politics of nation-building, Harris Mylonas argues that a state's nation-building policies toward non-core groups - any aggregation of individuals perceived as an unassimilated ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state - are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups.
Webcast

Getting Out of Iraq in 1932

April 29, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Iraq was the single mandated territory—out of fourteen—to achieve independent statehood while still under the jurisdiction of the League of Nations. Overseeing this process, the League’s expert bodies became ever more skeptical of the panacea of independent statehood. Through this case, we can see this modern state system in the making.
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Why Did Russia Let the Republics Go? Revisiting the Fall of the USSR

April 29, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Few people expected the USSR to fall apart as it did, without a major bloodshed. Serhii Plokhii, Mykhailo Hrushevsky Professor of Ukrainian History, Harvard University, attempts to answer the question of why Russia of Boris Yeltsin did not follow into the footsteps of Serbia of Slobodan Milosevic, by examining the decisions made by Boris Yeltsin and his advisors in the late summer and fall of 1991.
Webcast

The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia

April 26, 2013 // 9:30am11:00am
North Korea International Documentation Project
Andrei Lankov will discuss his new book, "The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia"

How Turkey’s Islamists Fell out of love with Iran: The Near Future of Turkish-Iranian Relations

April 23, 2013 // 3:00pm4:00pm
Global Europe Program
After the 1979 revolution, Iran’s Islamist regime emerged as the clear anti-thesis of a secular Turkey and two countries’ relationship was only sustained by political Islamists on both sides. According to Akin Unver, this 1979-2010 Islamist connection is also being reversed by the sectarian faultlines unearthed by the Arab Spring. Iran’s rapid fall from grace with Turkish Islamists is one of the most important recent structural shifts in the Middle East, Unver suggests. Such a break is far from marginal and yields several important points for consideration.
Webcast

Bureaucracy, Citizenship and Remembrance in Wartime Iraq

April 22, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Iraq war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance with the Iraq government managing resistance and religious diversity and shaping a public culture in which soldiering and martyrdom became markers of privileged citizenship. The men and families of those who fought and died during the Iran-Iraq and First Gulf wars have memories not only of the political, social, and cultures changes in Iraq but also of the “normalization” of war.

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