History Events

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D-Archives: How Digitizing Declassified Documents Can Restore Ukraine’s National Memory and Build an Independent, Democratic Country

April 16, 2013 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Volodymyr Viatrovych, historian and former Director, Security Services of Ukraine Special State Archive Department, discussed how Ukraine’s future as an independent country and democratic society rests on the proposition that restoring the nation’s historical memory is a critically important precondition to overcome Ukraine’s Soviet past and to bring about national reconciliation.
Webcast
Podcast

Six Moments of Crisis: Inside British Foreign Policy

April 15, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Gill Bennett, former Chief Historian of the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office leads a discussion entitled "Six Moments of Crisis: Inside British Foreign Policy."

A Muslim Tale of Two Cities: ‘We Met the Trains’

April 10, 2013 // 2:30pm3:30pm
Global Europe Program
The forced migration of Muslims from the Balkans to Turkey is one of the least known movements of people in modern times. In "A Muslim Tale of Two Cities" Frances Trix focuses on urban Muslims from the central Balkans and the hometown associations they founded in Turkish cities.
Webcast

Historical Perspective on the Arab Spring

April 08, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In the Middle East, a parallel pattern can be seen in the history of the first Middle Eastern constitutional revolutions in the political movements of the 1870s. What does an examination of the role of constitutionalism in the Arab revolutions of 1923-2011 reveal about prospects for constitutional governments in the Middle East?
Webcast

Celebrating the Legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan: The Launch of "Moynihan's Moment," a New Book by Gil Troy

April 04, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
McGill University Professor of History Gil Troy leads on expert panel on his latest book, "Moynihan's Moment: America's Fight Against Zionism as Racism" which explores the legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan.

The Power of Weak States in International Politics: Eastern Europe in the 20th Century

April 04, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
"Weak states can be both policy takers and, occasionally, policy makers," argues Laszlo Borhi in a presentation examining weak states in East Central Europe in the 20th century. Focusing on several case studies, Borhi looks at three periods: the aftermath of World War I and World War II and the post-1989 era.

The Third Side of the Cold War: Movement of the Non-aligned States, Yugoslavia and the World

April 03, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on the private document collections of two former Yugoslav ministers of foreign affairs, Tvrtko Jakovina renders an account of Tito's last years in office and the role Yugoslavia played as the leader of the Movement of the Non-aligned Countries from 1960s until 1990s.
Webcast

Taiwan's Cross-Strait Policy and Its Security Implications

April 02, 2013 // 10:00am11:00am
Asia Program
Taiwan’s economic ties with China continue to grow steadily. Yet political tensions between the two sides remain unresolved. Where are relations between Taipei and Beijing heading as security threats increase in East Asia on the one hand and the United States rebalances its priorities toward the region on the other?
Webcast
Podcast

The Way the Wind Actually Blew: Weatherman Underground Terrorism and the Counterculture, 1969-1971

April 01, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The most famous terrorist group in modern American history was the Weatherman Underground, later called the Weather Underground Organization. An outgrowth of Students for a Democratic Society, Weather was active in 1969 through the 1970s. Arthur Eckstein will argue that this is misleading and that the true history of Weather is much grimmer and more ambiguous.

The Sandzak Divided: Language and Identity Politics on Either Side of the New Serbian/Montenegrin Border

March 28, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
In the post-Yugoslav context, members of these Muslim communities have largely self-identified as Bosniaks, an ethnic/national term that gained prominence among Bosnian Muslims in the period immediately following the dissolution of Yugoslavia in 1991 and the outbreak of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. While language policies in this region were centrally formulated in the joint state, with the dissolution of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro in 2006, the two halves of the Sandžak experienced divergent language policies. In his presentation, Robert Greenberg, professor of linguistics at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, argues that the division of the Sandžak may have been a catalyst for destabilizing and radicalized forces to emerge in the years following the formal Serbia/Montenegro split.

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