History Events

Taiwan and the U.S. Pivot to Asia: New Realities in the Region?

February 26, 2013 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Asia Program
As the United States rebalances its diplomatic and military focus toward Asia, some analysts have voiced concern about what a greater U.S. presence in the region might mean for cross-Strait relations. While ties between China and Taiwan have improved in recent years, will the U.S. pivot toward Asia shape the further evolution of cross-Strait relations? Will other Taiwanese interests be impacted by the rebalance? Could Chinese uneasiness about the rebalance work to Taiwan’s detriment? From Washington’s perspective, how does Taiwan fit into the pivot?

Korea Foundation Junior Scholars' Presentations

February 26, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
Korea Foundation Junior Scholars will present on the results of their research conducted at the Wilson Center from September 2012 through February 2013.
Webcast
Podcast

Book Launch: U.S. Ambassadors to Mexico, The Relationship Through Their Eyes

February 26, 2013 // 1:30pm3:30pm
Mexico Institute
Please join us for a discussion with the book’s author and three of the ambassadors whose testimonies constitute the centerpiece of the volume.
Podcast

The Arab Revolution

February 25, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Arab academics and activists call the uprisings that started in early 2011 across the Arab world “revolutions.” Yet the “Arab Revolution” is both similar and dissimilar to the French, Russian, and other great revolutions that molded the history of the Western world, as described by Crane Brinton in his classic, The Anatomy of Revolution.
Webcast

China Goes Global: The Partial Power

February 19, 2013 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Kissinger Institute on China and the United States
Most global citizens are well aware of the explosive growth of the Chinese economy. Indeed, China has famously become the "workshop of the world." Yet, while China watchers have shed much light on the country's internal dynamics--China's politics, its vast social changes, and its economic development--few have focused on how this increasingly powerful nation has become more active and assertive throughout the world. Check out the webcast here!
Webcast

Roundtable Discussion on the Future of U.S. Global Media

February 12, 2013 // 3:30pm5:00pm
History and Public Policy Program
In any given week, from North Korea to Iran and across the Middle East, from China to Afghanistan, Pakistan and Myanmar, through Africa and India to Russia, Belarus, Central Asia and Cuba, 165 million people—equivalent to more than half the U.S. population—tune into the radio and television programs of U.S. International Broadcasting (USIB) by satellite, Internet and in some cases cooperating local radio stations. After more than half a century, Congressionally-funded U.S. broadcasting remains the leading edge of American soft power—the principal means by which the United States speaks directly to less free and impoverished nations.

CANCELLED: Britain – the Question of Written Constitutions and the World Since 1776

February 11, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
After the American and French Revolutions, new-style written constitutions gradually came to be viewed as an essential symbol of a modern state. Britain fought against these two revolutions and has famously retained its un-codified constitution.
Webcast
Podcast

Six Months in 1945: The Origins of the Cold War

February 04, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Cold War effectively began in 1945, as soon as Americans and Russians encountered each other in the heart of Europe. But nobody, not least Stalin, wanted the Cold War.

From Challengers to Partners? Relations Between Human Rights NGOs and their Home Governments from the 1970s on

January 30, 2013 // 12:00pm12:45pm
History and Public Policy Program
The concept of human rights acquired global significance during the 1970s, spurred by the activities of a growing number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) responding to state repression in Chile, South Africa, the Warsaw Pact states, and elsewhere. Key interlocutors for NGOs like Amnesty International and Helsinki Watch were their home governments, whom they influenced through a combination of public campaigning and private lobbying. Crucially, it seems that during this period human rights NGOs experienced a trajectory from ‘outsider’ to ‘insider’ status. Does this mean that they paid a costly price for their newfound influence, namely abandoning their original ‘apolitical’ appeal and becoming less impartial and independent? Or should we understand this to be their success in transforming the character of international politics?
Webcast

Was the Mexican Revolution of 1910 a Success?

December 10, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Mexican Revolution of 1910 had dramatic effects on both Mexico and the United States that have endured to the present day. This presentation deals with its armed phase (1910-1920) and its institutional, reformist, and state-building phase (c.1920–c.1940), as well as its longer-term legacy.

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