International Security Events

Podcast

Global Water Security: The Intelligence Community Assessment

May 09, 2012 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Panelists from the Department of State, National Intelligence Council, Stimson Center, and National Geographic came together at the Wilson Center recently to discuss the U.S. intelligence community’s global water security assessment.

The Path to Lower Nuclear Numbers?

May 04, 2012 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
Speaker: Jon Wolfsthal, Deputy Director, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey Institute for International Studies.
John O. Brennan
Webcast

The Efficacy and Ethics of U.S. Counterterrorism Strategy

April 30, 2012 // 12:00pm1:15pm
International Security Studies
One year after the death of bin Laden, the White House’s top counter-terrorism expert John Brennan discussed the Administration’s ongoing efforts to destroy al Qaeda and its affiliates, as well as the standards and practices behind those efforts. In this Director's Forum, Brennan acknowledged the use of drone strikes against terrorists, and targeted killings overseas.
Webcast

Seguridad democrática: de las propuestas a la implementación de políticas públicas

April 26, 2012 // 6:00pmApril 27, 2012 // 5:00pm
Latin American Program
Un seminario regional con los siguientes paneles: "Experiencias de reforma y estrategias de gobierno de la seguridad," "Políticas de seguridad democrática: zonas en tensión," y "La reforma policial y la investigación de redes de ilegalidad y criminalidad compleja."
Webcast
Podcast

Sex and World Peace: How the Treatment of Women Affects Development and Security

April 26, 2012 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Valerie Hudson and Chad Emmett present their new book in which they argue that the status of women is the single most important predictive factor in determining state stability.
Webcast

Nigeria Beyond the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Governance

April 25, 2012 // 8:30am5:30pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Media coverage and policy debates outside Nigeria rarely go beyond covering the latest crisis. This conference goes beyond the headlines to better understand key challenges and opportunities.
Webcast
Podcast

The Future of South Asian Security: Prospects for a Nontraditional Regional Architecture?

April 11, 2012 // 9:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
“The nontraditional security threats of tomorrow could themselves become sources of future traditional conflict if they’re not effectively addressed today,” said Mahin Karim.
Webcast
Podcast

Whither Pakistan-U.S. Relations? Looking Toward the Afghan Endgame and 2014

April 10, 2012 // 11:00am12:30pm
Asia Program
Reluctant allies, Pakistan and the US grudgingly need each other to reach shared goals: keeping Al Qaeda out of Afghanistan and structuring an orderly withdrawal of NATO forces. Wilson Center expert Zahid Hussain offers ways to thaw what right now is a “frozen” relationship.
Duke, Arctic

Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference [Chapel Hill, NC]

March 28, 2012 // 1:45pm6:45pm
Canada Institute
The Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and Kennan Institute, with the Center for Canadian Studies at Duke University, joined UNC Chapel Hill’s Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) to host Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference on March 28, 2012 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The conference brought together policymakers, academics, students, and environmentalists to explore diverse issues related to Arctic resource and energy management from Russian, Canadian, American, and other perspectives.
Open Source Image. Created and copyright (2006) by Yeu Ninje.
Webcast
Podcast

Game Change in the Asia-Pacific: The South China Sea and TPP

March 27, 2012 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Asia Program
China has recently been a major force in political games in the Asia-Pacific. For example, it has succeeded in partly disengaging the United States from the trade framework in Southeast Asia by promoting “low quality” Free Trade Agreements in the region. China has also viewed the ASEAN Regional Forum and East Asia Summit as convenient non-binding and consensus-based arenas that allow Beijing to avoid dealing with hard issues such as maritime disputes in the South China Sea. The Obama administration’s much-discussed “Asia Pivot” is an attempt to reinsert the United States into regional political games and is perhaps most evident in the administration’s focus on the Trans-Pacific Partnership multilateral FTA. How is the United States’ reemergence as a regional player changing the existing components of the political game? What trade and strategic initiatives is Washington undertaking? How will other regional players, such as Japan and India, respond to American and Chinese moves?

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