Latin America Events

Education and Social Development in the Americas: The Case of Argentina

June 20, 2005 // 9:30am5:00pm
Latin American Program
The Latin American Program organized a conference focusing on the importance of education in social development and the impact of social and education reforms in Latin America, with specific emphasis on the Argentine case.

The Peace Process with the ELN in Colombia

June 20, 2005 // 12:00am2:00pm
Latin American Program
Briefing with Ambassador Andrés Valencia, former facilitator of a peace dialogue between the Government of Colombia and Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN). Remarks are available in spanish.

U.S. Policy in Colombia: Current and Future Challenges

June 14, 2005 // 8:30am10:00am
Latin American Program
A briefing by The Honorable William B. Wood, United States Ambassador to Colombia. Read the full transcript of Ambassador Wood's speech.

Live Webcast--Gender and Trade:Identifying Myths, Overcoming Challenges and Developing Alternatives

May 20, 2005 // 8:15am12:30pm
Program on America and the Global Economy
Video of this event is now available.

No Longer Invisible: African-descendants in Mexico

May 11, 2005 // 9:00am10:30am
Mexico Institute

Election Observation Missions - Making Them Count

April 29, 2005 // 8:15am1:15pm
Africa Program
This conference examined recent history and trends in elections observation around the world, including steps for the future, with experts on elections in Africa, Latin America, and the former Soviet Union in order to develop a practice of effective follow-up on the recommendations of election observation missions.

Is Debt Destiny? Argentina, Emerging Markets, and the Future of Finance

April 19, 2005 // 9:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
"How could this happen?" Paul Blustein asked himself while dispatched to Argentina in the wake of its 2001 economic crash. Reports of shantytown residents in the street butchering Angus steers from an overturned truck and of starving children in a nation of agricultural plenty stood in stark contrast to previous impressions of the much lauded and booming Argentina—a country on its way, until late 2001, to joining the ranks of wealthy nations. Blustein explores Argentina's over-hyped rise and dramatic fall (which brought about 25% unemployment, the peso's collapse, and political and social chaos) and the role international financial institutions and market players played in both. His book reminds us that the path from developing nation to developed can be perilous, in this case yielding a Latin American Enron on the scale of the nation state.

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