Middle East and North Africa Events

OFFSITE EVENT: Negotiating Independence: New Directions in the History of Decolonization and the Cold War

May 03, 2013 // 8:00amMay 04, 2013 // 1:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The advent of decolonization, particularly after the Second World War, shares more than a chronological partnership with the Cold War. While the general economic, political, social, and ideological connections between decolonization and the Cold War have been acknowledged, a more detailed interrogation of the confluence of these two phenomena is now beginning to emerge.

The Bread Revolutions of 2011 and the Political Economies of Transition

April 30, 2013 // 10:00am11:30am
Middle East Program
During the 2011 uprisings, Arab protestors channeled decades of discontent with failed economic policy. However, the demise of leaders will not be enough to answer this discontent nor ensure productive development. Scholarship on the political determinates of economic development finds that the common recipe of expanding the private sector and increasing trade openness may be valuable, but alone are not sufficient for successful development. The Arab World’s economic path to 2011 included implementation in these areas, yet reform in underlying socio-economic structures and interests lagged. Addressing these conditions constitutes one of the most serious challenges facing Arab economies and politics.

The Media & Iran’s Nuclear Program: An analysis of U.S. and U.K. coverage, 2009-2012

April 29, 2013 // 9:00am10:30am
Middle East Program
How does news coverage of Iran’s nuclear program affect public understanding and policy outcomes? News media traditionally play an important role in communicating about foreign policy—is this the case with coverage of Iran’s nuclear program? How specifically are news media framing the relevant issues? To answer these questions, researchers from the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM) undertook a topical analysis of English-language newspaper coverage from 2009 through 2012, a period in which there was considerable public discussion about how the United States and others could and should resolve the dispute.
Photo by Mona Youssef

Opposition Strategies in Egypt

April 26, 2013 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Middle East Program
Amr Hamzawy discusses opposition strategies in Egypt and how they can contribute to the democratization process.

How Turkey’s Islamists Fell out of love with Iran: The Near Future of Turkish-Iranian Relations

April 23, 2013 // 3:00pm4:00pm
Global Europe Program
After the 1979 revolution, Iran’s Islamist regime emerged as the clear anti-thesis of a secular Turkey and two countries’ relationship was only sustained by political Islamists on both sides. According to Akin Unver, this 1979-2010 Islamist connection is also being reversed by the sectarian faultlines unearthed by the Arab Spring. Iran’s rapid fall from grace with Turkish Islamists is one of the most important recent structural shifts in the Middle East, Unver suggests. Such a break is far from marginal and yields several important points for consideration.

Justice Interrupted: The Struggle for Constitutional Government in the Middle East

April 23, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
The Arab Spring uprisings of 2011 were often portrayed in the media as a dawn of democracy in the region. But the revolutionaries were—and saw themselves as—heirs to a centuries-long struggle for just government and the rule of law, a struggle obstructed by local elites as well as the interventions of foreign powers. Thompson uncovers the deep roots of liberal constitutionalism in the Middle East through the remarkable stories of those who fought against poverty, tyranny, and foreign rule.
Webcast

Bureaucracy, Citizenship and Remembrance in Wartime Iraq

April 22, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The Iraq war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance with the Iraq government managing resistance and religious diversity and shaping a public culture in which soldiering and martyrdom became markers of privileged citizenship. The men and families of those who fought and died during the Iran-Iraq and First Gulf wars have memories not only of the political, social, and cultures changes in Iraq but also of the “normalization” of war.
Webcast

The Impact of Violence Against Women on Maternal Health

April 18, 2013 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Maternal Health Initiative
Physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a spouse or partner is a major factor in maternal and reproductive health, says Jay Silverman.
Webcast

Strategic Options for Iran: Balancing Pressure with Diplomacy

April 17, 2013 // 12:15pm2:00pm
Former senior national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of Middle East experience have joined to present a balanced report on the strategic options for dealing with Iran. The report will be discussed at this event in collaboration with The Iran Project.
Webcast

The Second Arab Awakening: Revolution, Democracy and the Islamist Challenge from Tunis to Damascus

April 17, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Middle East Program
When, in early 2011, people poured onto the streets of Arab cities to demand freedom, it was not for the first time. An earlier spate of revolutions swept the Arab world in the 1950s and 1960s. Those revolutions that had promised so much bequeathed the recent crop of Arab despots. Dawisha puts the recent Arab awakening into historical context, then traces the progress and fates so far of revolutions from Tunis to Damascus, examining the overthrow of tyrants in some cases and the more brutal repression in others.

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