Migration Events

Webcast

A New Climate for Peace: Taking Action on Climate and Fragility Risks (Report Launch)

June 22, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
The ultimate “threat multiplier,” climate change is increasing the challenges facing the U.S. development, diplomatic, and security communities. Join leaders from the development, diplomatic, and security communities and the report’s coauthors for the U.S. launch of a “New Climate for Peace.”
Webcast

Youth Repatriation in Guatemala: The Realities of Returning Home

June 16, 2015 // 9:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
This event features two of the authors of a new paper published by the Latin American Program on the repatriation of Guatemalan migrants. The paper is based on fieldwork conducted in Guatemala in March by four George Washington University graduate students.
Webcast

Is the United States at a Crossroads? Domestic and Global Dimensions

May 15, 2015 // 9:00am12:45pm
In this half-day conference, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and leading experts from journalism and academia discussed the role of the United States in the world today and the future of U.S. immigration policy.
Webcast

Promoting Peace and Prosperity in Honduras: A Conversation with His Excellency Juan Orlando Hernández, President of the Republic of Honduras

April 22, 2015 // 10:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
The Wilson Center, International Republican Institute, and National Democratic Institute, invite you to a special event with the President of Honduras.

Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan

April 13, 2015 // 2:00pm4:15pm
Asia Program
With nearly 98 percent of the population believed to be nationals of the country, Japan can seem to be a racially homogenous society. For foreigners already calling Japan home, though, living in a country where there is little racial diversity can be a challenge. That includes those who are half-Japanese.
Webcast

Islands as Champions of Resilience

March 25, 2015 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
In contrast to the common narrative of small-island states being among the most vulnerable to climate change, their growing experience in climate-compatible development, disaster prevention, and coordinating information and aid in new ways may be a valuable asset, said panelists at the Wilson Center on March 25.
Webcast

Scaling the Mountain: Women, Health, and the Environment in Nepal

January 07, 2015 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
From the mountains and foothills of the Himalayas to the Terai plains, climate change is rapidly changing life in Nepal. Many communities however, are not strangers to environmental stress; for decades, rapid population growth alongside agriculture and fuelwood collection have degraded land and diminished forests.
Webcast

The First Binational Forum on Migration and the Right to an Identity

November 12, 2014 // 11:30am2:30pm
Mexico Institute
The Woodrow Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Be Foundation were pleased to host the First Binational Forum on Migration and the Right to an Identity: The Double Invisibility of Mexican Migrants in light of Potential U.S. Immigration Reform.
Webcast

Eastern Europe’s Most Difficult Transition: Public Health and Demographic Policy, Two Decades after the Cold War

September 23, 2014 // 9:00am11:00am
Global Europe Program
Dr. Murray Feshbach was one of the first scholars to point out the devastating political and socio-economic effects of state communism’s failure to seriously address decaying public health and environmental conditions. His pioneering work remains relevant. More than two decades after the close of the Cold War, many health and demographic indicators in the former Warsaw-Pact states (including Russia) remain surprisingly inferior to those of the neighboring states of Western and Southern Europe.
Webcast

Is there Hope for Central American Youth?

September 18, 2014 // 9:00am12:00pm
Latin American Program
Six expert panelists weigh in on the difficult situation facing Central American youth and offer possible solutions for improving their opportunities for education and employment.

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