Nuclear History Events

Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis

October 23, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Historian presents a panel discussion, Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis.
Webcast

The Soviet Cuban Missile Crisis: Castro, Mikoyan, Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Missiles of November

October 17, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Cold War International History Project
Based on secret transcripts of top-level diplomacy undertaken by the number-two Soviet leader, Anastas Mikoyan, to settle the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, this book rewrites conventional history. The "missiles of October" and "13 days" were only half the story: the nuclear crisis actually stretched well into November 1962 as the Soviets secretly planned to leave behind in Cuba over 100 tactical nuclear weapons, then reversed themselves because of obstreperous behavior by Fidel Castro. The highly-charged negotiations with the Cuban leadership, who bitterly felt sold out by Soviet concessions to the United States, were led by Mikoyan.
Webcast

Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979-1988

October 15, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
With its remarkable declassified documentation and oral testimony that bear directly on questions of U.S. policymaking with regard to the Iran-Iraq War, "Becoming Enemies" reveals much that was previously unknown about U.S. policy before, during, and after the war. The authors go beyond mere reportage to offer lessons regarding fundamental foreign policy challenges to the U.S. that transcend time and place.
Webcast

Is the World More Dangerous 50 years after the Cuban Missile Crisis?

October 15, 2012 // 1:00pm2:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
In October the world will observe the 50th Anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, when the world came closest to nuclear war. In this Wilson Center National Conversation, panelists will discuss the Cuban Missile Crisis and the lessons that it holds in the context of the upcoming US presidential election.

Thirteen Days and More: A Soviet Perspective on the Cuban Missile Crisis

September 24, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Fifty years ago, the world spent thirteen days transfixed as the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. engaged in a contest of wills over placement of Soviet missiles in Cuba. Svetlana Savranskaya will discuss behind-the-scenes maneuvers by Soviet second-in-command Anastas Mikoyan, revealing that the crisis lasted into November and involved plans by the U.S.S.R. to leave tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba, foiled not by U.S. resolve, but by Fidel Castro’s own actions.

OFF-SITE CONFERENCE: United Atoms in a Divided World: The Early History of the International Atomic Energy Agency

September 16, 2012 // 7:30pmSeptember 18, 2012 // 3:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
The Department of Contemporary History at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Wilson Center's Nuclear Proliferation International History Project will host an international conference on the history of the IAEA during the cold war years. The conference will cover a wide range of issues, including the creation of the Agency, its role in the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and the Agency's technical programs. Beyond that, the conference seeks to discuss the cultural, societal, and economic context of the IAEA's early history.

The Path to Lower Nuclear Numbers?

May 04, 2012 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
Speaker: Jon Wolfsthal, Deputy Director, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey Institute for International Studies.
Webcast
Podcast

The Role of Tacit Knowledge in WMD Proliferation: Past and Present

April 20, 2012 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
This talk will examine the extent to which tacit knowledge – work related to practical knowledge – is relevant to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The authors will discuss both historical and contemporary case studies of nuclear and biological weapons.
Webcast

The Last Time We Were at Nuclear Zero

February 23, 2012 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
With George Quester, Chairman of the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland and the J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Visiting Professor of International Affairs at The George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.
Webcast

Foreign Relations of the United States Series: SALT I, 1969–1972

February 02, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State's Office of the Historian presents a panel discussion on the latest volume in the FRUS Series.

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