Russia and Eurasia Events

"Angry Townspeople," the Internet, and the Market of Ideas: Vectors of Change in the Russian Public Sphere

April 23, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
The recent rise of public activity in Russia was facilitated by a quick growth of the number of users of Internet that has changed the configuration of the public sphere. How it affects the offer at the market of political ideas? What are the perspectives of political dialog? Is it possible to talk about the new quality of the practices of public communication? Olga Malinova, Chief Research Fellow, Institute of Scientific Information for Social Sciences, Russian Academy of Sciences, and Professor, Moscow State Institute of International Relations, Moscow, will argue that comparative analysis of electoral campaigns of 2011 and 2012 provides some evidence for answering these questions.

Has Vladimir Putin Always Been Corrupt? And Does it Matter?

April 16, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
President Vladimir Putin was “the person to know in St. Petersburg,” according to Karen Dawisha, Walter E. Havighurst Professor of Political Science and Director, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Miami Universtiy, Oxford, Ohio, and Public Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center, at a recent Kennan Institute event.

Book Discussion: "Russia: It Was a Long Time Ago and It Never Happened Anyway: Russia and the Communist Past"

April 02, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
David Satter, Senior Fellow, The Hudson Institute
Webcast
Podcast

Stalin and Togliatti: Italy and the Origins of the Cold War

March 28, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Elena Agarossi, professor of contemporary history at the Scuola Superiore di Pubblica Amministrazione in Rome and member of the Wilson Center European Alumni Association will lead a panel discussion on her latest book entitled Stalin and Togliatti: Italy and the Origins of the Cold War.

Energy Politics in Central Eurasia

March 28, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Spotlight on Central Eurasia Series // Stacy Closson argues that Central Asia is an energy and water rich region that, if cooperative, could cover their annual shortages of electricity, which range roughly around 25%, as well as decrease costs of energy, and protect the environment. Instead, the leaders have engaged in hostile practices that not only cause problems across borders and waste foreign investment and assistance, but also limit their developmental possibilities. Gregory Gleason notes that inherently non-transparent and centralized fixed energy infrastructures such as oil and gas pipelines and electric grids obscure financial transactions and are susceptible to political manipulation. Gleason, in his analysis of "power politics," explains why he sees the rapid pace of technology-driven market volatility in Eurasian markets as swiftly shifting Central Asian trends.
Duke, Arctic

Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference [Chapel Hill, NC]

March 28, 2012 // 1:45pm6:45pm
Canada Institute
The Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and Kennan Institute, with the Center for Canadian Studies at Duke University, joined UNC Chapel Hill’s Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) to host Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference on March 28, 2012 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The conference brought together policymakers, academics, students, and environmentalists to explore diverse issues related to Arctic resource and energy management from Russian, Canadian, American, and other perspectives.
Webcast
Podcast

The Kazakh Famine of 1930-33 and the Politics of History in the Post-Soviet Space

March 26, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Sparked by Stalin’s brutal policies, the Kazakh famine of 1930-1933 devastated Soviet Kazakhstan, leading to the death of more than a quarter of the republic’s population. Today, competing portraits of this disaster play a crucial role in the politics of history across the former Soviet space, particularly in Kazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine. In her talk, Dr. Cameron will examine the causes and consequences of the Kazakh famine, with particular emphasis on the catastrophe’s reverberations today.
Webcast
Podcast

Regional Perspectives on the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit

March 21, 2012 // 3:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
On March 26-27, Seoul will host the second Nuclear Security Summit, an initiative established by the Obama administration in Washington in 2010. Fifty world leaders, as well as scores of NGOs and industry and business representatives on the periphery of the central meeting, will discuss the summit’s main aim: to prevent loose nuclear materials from falling into the hands of terrorists. Naturally, different regional actors will have different agendas and priorities for the summit, and it is therefore important to consider the issues and concerns for Northeast Asian, South Asian, Middle Eastern, and former Soviet states and stakeholders.

Prospects for American Investors in Kazakhstan

March 19, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
William Veale, Executive Director, U.S.-Kazakhstan Business Association

The Present Situation in Ukraine

March 12, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
William Green Miller, Senior Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center , and former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine

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