Russia Events

Revisiting "The Icon and the Axe" and Its Impact on Russian Studies

February 03, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Michael David-Fox will first speak about his own engagement with "The Icon and the Axe" and what it has meant for him during a quarter century studying and researching Russian and Soviet history. Eric Lohr will reflect upon how the "The Icon and the Axe" impacted his decision to pursue Russian studies and the impact of the book and Billington's Faces of Russia video series upon his students. Kathleen Parthé will focus on some of the reasons for the enduring appeal of "The Icon and the Axe" among a wide variety of readers.
Webcast

Foreign Relations of the United States Series: SALT I, 1969–1972

February 02, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State's Office of the Historian presents a panel discussion on the latest volume in the FRUS Series.
Henry Hale at The Wilson Center

Russians May be Tiring of Putin Dominance, as Presidential Elections Approach

January 30, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
United Russia is weaker today partly because of changes the party made in its appointment of provincial governors during the Putin and Medvedev administrations, said Henry Hale, Director of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University. And although Putin is strongly favored, the outcome is still uncertain for Russia’s upcoming presidential vote, as support ebbs for the former president as voters tire of more than a decade of Putin’s dominance of national politics.

Monument Wars across the Post-Soviet Space as a Conflict of Memories and Cultures

January 23, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
The destruction of the monuments of the Soviet past and a buildup of new monuments was supposed to be an indication of the new values that came to the post-Soviet societies after the collapse of the Soviet system. However, not everywhere and not always did it happen to be true. While in Poland the new monuments were accepted by the society in appreciative manner, in Ukraine, Estonia, and Georgia we watched the so-called phenomenon of “The War of the Monuments” when the removal of the old monuments and creation of the new ones was followed by protests and sometimes even riots. Around Russia many old monuments to Lenin remained at place while new monuments to the Russian tsars were erected. All of this basically resulted with a chaos of the views and attitudes and led to the devaluation of the monument as a symbol in the post-Soviet space.

Civil Society and Election Campaigns: Negative and Positive Influences on the Vector of Russian Political Development

January 10, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
After the parliamentary elections on December 4th and public reactions to their outcome, the sociopolitical situation in Russia is changing rapidly. Are these processes irreversible, and what are their tendencies? What are the changes in correlation between civil society resources and political party resources, based on the election's results? The speaker will discuss the state’s “forms of public control,” how they influenced the last election campaign, and what new forms of control might emerge during the next presidential election in March 2012. She will also discuss the possible reputational risks for public and other organizations from attempted manipulation by the ruling powers during the election campaign.
Webcast

Jackson-Vanik after Russia’s Accession to the WTO (Offsite)

December 13, 2011 // 12:00pm1:15pm
Wilson Center on the Hill
On 13 December 2011, a panel of experts presented on Capitol Hill as part of the Wilson Center on the Hill program to discuss the status of the Jackson-Vanik Amendment following Russia’s accession to the WTO. For video of the Wilson Center on the Hill briefing, including commentary from Woodrow Wilson Center CEO and President Jane Harman, please click here.

Preface to a Russian Jazz Archive

December 05, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Russia has a long, complicated history with jazz, reaching back to the 1920s. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian jazz has been undergoing a fertile period of revitalization, both in the classroom and on the bandstand. In 2011, Larry Appelbaum traveled to Russia to meet with academics, critics, broadcasters and musicians in order to consult on the vision and planning for a Russian Jazz Archive and Research Center. He will discuss the challenges, prospects and progress toward the opening of the archive, scheduled for 2012 in Yaroslavl.

Tolstoy and Russian Politics

November 28, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
This illustrated talk will explore why Tolstoy continues to be such a politically explosive figure in Russia today. As well as providing an overview of the writer’s often fraught relationship with the Tsarist regime, it will show how the Soviet government systematically sought to suppress his religious and philosophical legacy after 1917, and how the Kennan Institute played a crucial role in preserving it.

British Plans and Attempts at Subversion in Romania, 1939-44

November 22, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Dennis Deletant, Visiting Ion Ratiu Professor of Romanian Studies at Georgetown University and formerly professor of Romanian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College in London charts the operations in Romania between 1939 and 23 August 1944, the date of King Michael’s coup against Antonescu.

The Tolerance Program in St. Petersburg (2006-2011): Its Logic and First Results

November 17, 2011 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute

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