Security and Defense Events

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The Future of South Asian Security: Prospects for a Nontraditional Regional Architecture?

April 11, 2012 // 9:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
“The nontraditional security threats of tomorrow could themselves become sources of future traditional conflict if they’re not effectively addressed today,” said Mahin Karim.
Webcast
Podcast

Whither Pakistan-U.S. Relations? Looking Toward the Afghan Endgame and 2014

April 10, 2012 // 11:00am12:30pm
Asia Program
Reluctant allies, Pakistan and the US grudgingly need each other to reach shared goals: keeping Al Qaeda out of Afghanistan and structuring an orderly withdrawal of NATO forces. Wilson Center expert Zahid Hussain offers ways to thaw what right now is a “frozen” relationship.

Political Demography: How Population Changes are Reshaping International Security and National Politics [Monterey, CA]

March 30, 2012 // 8:30am2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Ten years ago, demography was hardly on the radar screen of policymakers. Today, it’s a part of almost every discussion of America’s long-term fiscal, economic, or foreign policy direction. With the world’s population hitting 7 billion last year, and headed for 10 billion in the next century, it is crucial to assess the impact of global population trends on international security and national politics. Top demographic security experts discuss this important trend at a half day workshop at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.
Webcast
Podcast

Drug Policy and Democracy in Central America: A View from Guatemala

March 29, 2012 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Latin American Program
Secretary Fernando Carrera discussed recent proposals made by Guatemalan President Otto Pérez Molina regarding drug legalization.
Open Source Image. Created and copyright (2006) by Yeu Ninje.
Webcast
Podcast

Game Change in the Asia-Pacific: The South China Sea and TPP

March 27, 2012 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Asia Program
China has recently been a major force in political games in the Asia-Pacific. For example, it has succeeded in partly disengaging the United States from the trade framework in Southeast Asia by promoting “low quality” Free Trade Agreements in the region. China has also viewed the ASEAN Regional Forum and East Asia Summit as convenient non-binding and consensus-based arenas that allow Beijing to avoid dealing with hard issues such as maritime disputes in the South China Sea. The Obama administration’s much-discussed “Asia Pivot” is an attempt to reinsert the United States into regional political games and is perhaps most evident in the administration’s focus on the Trans-Pacific Partnership multilateral FTA. How is the United States’ reemergence as a regional player changing the existing components of the political game? What trade and strategic initiatives is Washington undertaking? How will other regional players, such as Japan and India, respond to American and Chinese moves?
Webcast
Podcast

Fighting Transnational Organized Crime

March 23, 2012 // 9:00am10:30am
Latin American Program
General Douglas Fraser discusses international efforts to tackle the complex challenge of organized crime and restore citizen security in Central and South America.
Webcast
Podcast

Regional Perspectives on the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit

March 21, 2012 // 3:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
On March 26-27, Seoul will host the second Nuclear Security Summit, an initiative established by the Obama administration in Washington in 2010. Fifty world leaders, as well as scores of NGOs and industry and business representatives on the periphery of the central meeting, will discuss the summit’s main aim: to prevent loose nuclear materials from falling into the hands of terrorists. Naturally, different regional actors will have different agendas and priorities for the summit, and it is therefore important to consider the issues and concerns for Northeast Asian, South Asian, Middle Eastern, and former Soviet states and stakeholders.
Webcast
Podcast

China and Coexistence: Beijing's National Security Strategy for the Twenty-First Century

March 12, 2012 // 4:00pm5:15pm
Asia Program
"Peaceful coexistence," long a key phrase in China’s strategic thinking, is a constructive doctrine that offers China a path for influencing the international system. So argues Liselotte Odgaard in this timely analysis of China's national security strategy in the context of its foreign policy practice. China’s program of peaceful coexistence emphasizes absolute sovereignty and non-interference in the internal affairs of other states. Odgaard suggests that China’s policy of working within the international community and with non-state actors such as the UN aims to win for China greater power and influence without requiring widespread exercise of military or economic pressure.
U.S. Government Counterterrorism: A Guide to Who Does What

Book Discussion--U.S. Government Counterterrorism: A Guide to Who Does What

February 27, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
International Security Studies
Michael Kraft, former senior advisor, State Department Counterterrorism Office, and Edward Marks, former U.S. ambassador, Department of State discuss their new book, U.S. Government Counterterrorism: A Guide to Who Does What.
Webcast

The Last Time We Were at Nuclear Zero

February 23, 2012 // 12:00pm1:30pm
International Security Studies
With George Quester, Chairman of the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland and the J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Visiting Professor of International Affairs at The George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

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