Society and Culture Events

Waking from the Dream: the Struggle for Civil Rights in the Shadow of Martin Luther King

December 01, 2014 // 2:28pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Exaggerated accounts of urban violence after Martin Luther King’s assassination, David Chappell will argue, have long obscured national reactions of far greater significance. Most important was the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which had been hopelessly stalled in Congress since 1966.

“A Sort of Chautauqua”

October 23, 2014 // 4:00pm6:00pm
Kennan Institute
The Chautauqua is a traveling tent-show that originated in America during the 1800s. These traveling shows featured popular talks intended to edify and entertain, improve the mind and bring culture and enlightenment to the ears and thoughts of the hearer. It is a model that inspires Oleksandr Boichenko, a literary critic, publicist, essayist and translator from Chernivtsi, an emerging center for Ukrainian literature. Boichenko’s Chautauqua at the Wilson Center will feature his writings and views on the impact of recent events, from the Maidan to the tenuous ceasefire, on Ukrainian culture.
Webcast

World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century (Book Launch)

October 23, 2014 // 10:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
'World Population and Human Capital in the Twenty-first Century' seeks to provide the top-level insights and detailed projections that policymakers and researchers need to make decisions supporting sustainable development in the 21st century. This book is the culmination of an international effort of more than 550 population experts, led by researchers at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and the Wittgenstein Centre in Vienna. It provides multi-dimensional projections of age, gender, and education distributions for 195 countries through the year 2100.

Film Screening: "The Winter that Changed Us: The First Death"

October 17, 2014 // 10:00am11:30am
Kennan Institute
The First Death is a short documentary film by Ukrainian independent film project Babylon'13, which details the Maidan movement's first casualty, Serhiy Nigoyan, who died on January 22nd, 2014 from gunshot wounds. Through interviews and live coverage of the events, the film makes the case that the deaths of Nigoyan and other protesters served as the catalyst that turned the movement from a demonstration into a revolution. Film Director Yuriy Gruzinov was joined by Wilson Center Senior Scholar and Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine William Miller to discuss the movie and the events in Kyiv that sparked the crisis.

Deputy Chairperson of the African Union Visits the Wilson Center

October 10, 2014 // 9:00am10:30pm
Africa Program
On October 10, 2014, Dr. Monde Muyangwa, director of the Africa Program at the Wilson Center welcomed H. E. Erastus J.O. Mwencha, Deputy Chairperson of the African Union to the Woodrow Wilson Center.

A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida

October 06, 2014 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
N. D. B. Connolly explores the history of real estate development and political power by offering an unprecedented look at the complexities of property ownership during the early and mid-twentieth century.

Midnight at the Pera Palace: The Birth of Modern Istanbul

September 24, 2014 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Global Europe Program
At midnight, December 31, 1925, citizens of the newly proclaimed Turkish Republic celebrated the New Year. For the first time ever, they had agreed to use a nationally unified calendar and clock. Yet in Istanbul—an ancient crossroads and Turkey's largest city—people were looking toward an uncertain future.
Webcast

American Isolationism: Is it a Myth or a Reality?

September 15, 2014 // 12:30pm1:45pm
The Chicago Council releases its 40th anniversary survey of Americans thoughts on foreign policy issues. An expert panel discusses the results, what it means for the future of U.S. policy, and what policymakers should learn from the public.

Scotland on the Eve of the Independence Referendum

September 03, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
On September 18th, Scottish voters will decide whether their country will be the first to secede from a Western-European state in recent history. After two years of campaigning it would seem that politicians, academics, and journalists would have a good understanding of the public sentiment. Using very recent data from the only large-scale, representative, and comprehensive attitudes surveys in Scotland, however, this talk will highlight where the general “wisdom” about Scots’ attitudes towards the referendum may be empirically wrong. The talk will also identify issues that may still move people, in either direction, before casting their vote.

"They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide"

August 14, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Kennan Institute
Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–1916 were committed.

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