Society and Culture Events

Webcast
Podcast

The Way the Wind Actually Blew: Weatherman Underground Terrorism and the Counterculture, 1969-1971

April 01, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The most famous terrorist group in modern American history was the Weatherman Underground, later called the Weather Underground Organization. An outgrowth of Students for a Democratic Society, Weather was active in 1969 through the 1970s. Arthur Eckstein will argue that this is misleading and that the true history of Weather is much grimmer and more ambiguous.

The Sandzak Divided: Language and Identity Politics on Either Side of the New Serbian/Montenegrin Border

March 28, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
In the post-Yugoslav context, members of these Muslim communities have largely self-identified as Bosniaks, an ethnic/national term that gained prominence among Bosnian Muslims in the period immediately following the dissolution of Yugoslavia in 1991 and the outbreak of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. While language policies in this region were centrally formulated in the joint state, with the dissolution of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro in 2006, the two halves of the Sandžak experienced divergent language policies. In his presentation, Robert Greenberg, professor of linguistics at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, argues that the division of the Sandžak may have been a catalyst for destabilizing and radicalized forces to emerge in the years following the formal Serbia/Montenegro split.

1989 After 1989: Memory in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe

March 14, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
The eastern European revolutions of 1989 were a watershed in global history. Despite this, in the two decades since, their meaning has become a source of debate. While they have been promoted as a founding myth for a newly unified Europe, eastern Europeans have repeatedly represented them as a moment of betrayal, martyrdom, liberation, victory, disappointment, loss, colonization, or nostalgia.
Webcast
Podcast

Book Launch: U.S. Ambassadors to Mexico, The Relationship Through Their Eyes

February 26, 2013 // 1:30pm3:30pm
Mexico Institute
Please join us for a discussion with the book’s author and three of the ambassadors whose testimonies constitute the centerpiece of the volume.

Protesting America: Democracy and the U.S.-Korea Alliance

February 21, 2013 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Asia Program
When the U.S.-Korea military alliance began to deteriorate in the 2000s, many commentators blamed "anti-Americanism" and nationalism, especially among younger South Koreans. Challenging these assumptions, Wellesley College professor and former Wilson Center scholar Katharine Moon argues in her latest book that Korean activism around U.S. relations owes more to transformations in domestic politics, including the decentralization of government, the diversification and politics of civil society organizations, and the transnationalization of social movements.
Yurii Urnov // Fulbright Scholar and visiting director, Woolly Mammoth Theatre, Washington, D.C. and Towson University, Baltimore
Webcast

Russian Contemporary Theatre: Beyond the Capital

February 12, 2013 // 6:00pm8:00pm
Kennan Institute
Archived webcast available. This program, named in honor of former Kennan Institute staff member Edmita Bulota, focused on key developments in the current scene of Russian theatre: new theatrical impulses in the Russian provinces, new writing and writers, theatre makers working outside of traditional theatrical forms with non-traditional audiences, and the recent manifestations of a new sets of relationships among art, artists and politics. Experts from the United States and Russia explored the impact of a rich decade of Russian productions seen in the U.S., with a particular emphasis on artists working outside of Moscow and St. Petersburg.
Webcast

How Society and Security Are Changing in an Aging World

January 30, 2013 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
“We are in the midst of a silent revolution,” said Ann Pawliczko, a senior technical advisor in the population and development branch at the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), quoting former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. “It is a revolution that extends well beyond demographics, with major economic, social, cultural, psychological, and spiritual implications.”

Politics, Religion, and Society in Latin America

January 16, 2013 // 9:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
Book Launch: Politics, Religion, and Society in Latin America
Andrey Miroshnichenko

Man as Media: Old Mass Media and the New Digital Environment in Russia and the United States

December 17, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
The third emancipation of text in human history is the emancipation of authorship. Problems of legacy media are usually explained by the development of multimedia and internet technologies. But the real disaster for old mass-media is the emancipated authorship of amateur “occasional” journalists. Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholar and consultant Andrey Miroshnichenko asks, what will be the result of the competition between the professionalism of staff journalists and the cognitive surplus of guerrilla journalists? How will business models and design of content develop in Russian and American media?
Webcast

The Remarkable Past and Present Fate of UNESCO

November 19, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
The United Nations Educational, Scientific, Cultural, and Communications Organization (UNESCO) grew from seeds planted during World War II and enjoyed bipartisan Congressional support as it joined the UN family in the 1940s. But controversy overtook it; the United States withdrew by 1984. It re-entered nearly twenty years later, but objecting to the agency’s 2011 vote to admit the Palestinian Authority, it began extracting itself once again. Barring a political miracle, the United States will assume observer status by this time next year. What will be the consequences?

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