Society and Culture Events

Reform Without End: Europe’s Welfare Traditions

October 22, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Surveying Europe’s welfare traditions since 1500, in this seminar session Tom Adams will discuss characteristics of the modern European welfare state, many rooted in long-held values and centuries of experience. Profound social changes have repeatedly challenged communities to re-examine and reshape institutions and practices. The diversity of arrangements across Europe has contributed to an ongoing exchange of observation, experiment, and aspiration – in short, to reform without end.

The Risk of War: Everyday Sociality in the Republic of Macedonia

October 18, 2012 // 10:00am11:00am
Global Europe Program
Vasiliki Neofotistos discusses her recently released book, "The Risk of War: Everyday Sociality in the Republic of Macedonia," focusing on the ways middle- and working-class Albanian and Macedonian noncombatants in Macedonia's capital city, Skopje, responded to disruptive and threatening changes in social structure during the 2001 armed conflict.
Webcast

2012 National Survey of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

September 25, 2012 // 1:00pm2:30pm
Asia Program
At this event, we will engage with researchers and leading Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) policy leaders on the results and implications of the groundbreaking 2012 National Survey of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. This is the largest-ever nationally representative and comprehensive survey of AAPI public opinion conducted in United States.
Podcast

The Spirit of Cities: Why the Identity of a City Matters in a Global Age

July 25, 2012 // 9:00am10:30am
Urban Sustainability Laboratory
Cities define us. They shape the outlooks, opportunities and lives of over half of the world’s population. Yet most contemporary political thought neglects their role. The Ancient Greeks, by contrast, thought that every city had its own ethos and values that helped to determine its institutions, political systems and the lives of its citizens. Daniel Bell thinks it is time to revive the thinking of the Greeks and rediscover the spirit of cities.
Webcast
Podcast

Religion and Violence in Central America

July 11, 2012 // 9:00am11:00am
Latin American Program
Violent crime in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala has reached unprecedented levels. It is frequently religious organizations that are on the front lines of efforts to reduce gang violence and get young people out of gangs.
Webcast
Podcast

Familiar Strangers in the Soviet Marketplace: Georgian Trade Networks between the Caucasus and Moscow

June 11, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
“Why were Georgian trade networks so successful?” asked Erik R. Scott, Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute, at an 11 June 2012 lecture. Georgian businessmen and their trade networks and products occupied a unique position in the informal economy in the Soviet Union and supplied many of the scarce and exotic goods Soviet consumers desired. Georgian trade networks exploited the mobility made possible by the porous internal borders of the Soviet Union. Scott characterized the Soviet Union as an “empire of diaspora” comprised of mobile ethnicities who could move and trade throughout the Union.
Webcast
Podcast

Brazil and South America

June 01, 2012 // 9:00am12:30pm
Latin American Program
On Friday, June 1, The Latin American Program and the Brazil Institute convene a panel of experts to discuss regional relations in South America.

Women’s Leadership in Post-Conflict Liberia: My Journey A Book Launch

May 30, 2012 // 10:00am12:00pm
Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity
Women’s Leadership in Post-Conflict Liberia: My Journey book launch with Author Olubanke King-Akerele, former Minister of Foreign Affairs in Liberia and Special Keynote Address from Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf via video-conference.

Book Discussion: Stage Fright: Politics and the Performing Arts in Late Imperial Russia

May 14, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
“Were the performing arts in imperial Russia an outlet for opposition politics or ideas? The historiography of the era predicts the answer is yes, but the reality is actually the opposite,” said Paul du Quenoy, Associate Professor, Department of History and Archeology, American University of Beirut, at a 14 May 2012 Kennan Institute lecture. Presenting the research behind his book, Stage Fright: Politics and the Performing Arts in Late Imperial Russia, du Quenoy contended that theatrical artists and artistic institutions of the era avoided politics, or were at least resistant to staging productions critical of the state.

Geopolitics, States, and Networks in Central Eurasia

May 09, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Spotlight on Central Eurasia Series // Authors and scholars Alexander Cooley and Alexander Kupatadze discuss their research into the interplay of geopolitics and local networks across Central Asia. Cooley explores the dynamics of the new competition between Russia, China and the United States over the region since 9/11, as well as how small states’ interaction with great powers advances our understanding of how world politics actually works in the contemporary era of diminishing Western influence and rising new regional powers. Author Alexander Kupatadze will discuss the diverging trajectories of organized crime in post-Soviet Eurasia focusing on professional criminals (so-called vory-v-zakone) in Georgia and drug smuggling groups in Kyrgyzstan.

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