Society and Culture Events

St. Petersburg Regionalism as a Political Force: 1980s to 2010s

April 30, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Lev Lurye, cultural historian, St. Petersburg

Translating Judgments into Policy: The Influence of the European Court of Human Rights on the Russian Criminal Justice System

April 26, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
The Kennan Institute, in partnership with the ABA Rule of Law Initiative, will host a seminar consisting of leading Russian human rights experts visiting the U.S. as part of ABA ROLI’s Conditions of Confinement and Prison Reform Study Tour, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. The meeting will address Russian citizens’ use of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) as a tool for justice, its judgments on prison issues, and the court’s broader influence on the Russian judicial system.

New Identities for an Ancient City: The Transformation of Kyiv through Art

February 27, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Kyiv needs a clear policy to balance its ancient history and rapid contemporary development. Dr. Moussienko will portray Kyiv as an arena of the various concepts metropolis development and expose the multifunctional role of public arts--from aesthetical to social. She underlines the role of the art as a factor in various social movements dedicated to preserving the historical face of Kyiv.

Culture and Power in Eurasia: Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan

February 23, 2012 // 3:30pm5:30pm
Kennan Institute
Spotlight on Central Eurasia Series // Based on ethnographic research with contemporary artists and galleries in Almaty, Kazakhstan, Nauruzbayeva traces the ways in which the Soviet-era notions of art as a public good are transforming into art as a private commodity. In the process of renegotiating the loss of the former state sponsorship and recruiting private consumers for their art, Kazakhstani visual artists challenge the notion of the market as an inevitable force that emerges out of the self-interest of market players. After independence, the Uzbek government maintained a monopoly over ideology, exploiting the remaining Soviet institutional and cultural legacies. The state expressed national identity through tightly controlled mass spectacles, including theatrical and musical performances. Adams' analysis of the content, form, and production of these ceremonies shows how Uzbekistan’s cultural and political elites engaged in a highly directed, largely successful program of nation building through culture.
Webcast

Grand Domestic Revolution: Recovering the Forgotten History of Feminism and Housing Design

February 15, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
United States Studies
Please join us for the fifth lecture in “The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History” lecture series, a joint venture between the The National Women’s History Museum (NWHM) and the Woodrow Wilson Center.
Webcast

Book Launch--The Swing Vote: The Untapped Power of Independents

February 09, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Program on America and the Global Economy
In The Swing Vote: The Untapped Power of Independents, author Linda Killian looks beyond the polls and the headlines and talks with the frustrated citizens who are raising the alarm about the acute bi-polarity, special interest-influence, and gridlock in Congress, asking why Obama’s postpartisan presidency is anything but, and demanding realism, honest negotiation, and a sense of responsibility from their elected officials.

Monument Wars across the Post-Soviet Space as a Conflict of Memories and Cultures

January 23, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
The destruction of the monuments of the Soviet past and a buildup of new monuments was supposed to be an indication of the new values that came to the post-Soviet societies after the collapse of the Soviet system. However, not everywhere and not always did it happen to be true. While in Poland the new monuments were accepted by the society in appreciative manner, in Ukraine, Estonia, and Georgia we watched the so-called phenomenon of “The War of the Monuments” when the removal of the old monuments and creation of the new ones was followed by protests and sometimes even riots. Around Russia many old monuments to Lenin remained at place while new monuments to the Russian tsars were erected. All of this basically resulted with a chaos of the views and attitudes and led to the devaluation of the monument as a symbol in the post-Soviet space.
Webcast

New Negro Women and Beyond: Posing Beauty in African American Culture

January 18, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
United States Studies
Join US Studies and the National Women's History Museum on Wednesday, January 18 for the fourth lecture in "The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women's History" series.

Opium Nation: Child Brides, Drug Lords, and One Woman's Journey Through Afghanistan

January 10, 2012 // 9:00am10:00am
Middle East Program
Journalist and author Fariba Nawa discussed her recently published book, Opium Nation, as well as the role of women in the drug trade in Afghanistan and within Afghan society during the war led by the United States.

Preface to a Russian Jazz Archive

December 05, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Kennan Institute
Russia has a long, complicated history with jazz, reaching back to the 1920s. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russian jazz has been undergoing a fertile period of revitalization, both in the classroom and on the bandstand. In 2011, Larry Appelbaum traveled to Russia to meet with academics, critics, broadcasters and musicians in order to consult on the vision and planning for a Russian Jazz Archive and Research Center. He will discuss the challenges, prospects and progress toward the opening of the archive, scheduled for 2012 in Yaroslavl.

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