U.S. Foreign Policy Events

Webcast

"Rogue States" and the United States: A Historical Perspective

September 19, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Vice President for Programs and Director of International Security Studies at the Woodrow Wilson Center Robert Litwak answers some of the biggest questions surrounding the relationship between today's "Rogue States" (North Korea, Libya, Iran) and the United States.
Webcast

“Rogue States” and the United States: An Historical Perspective

September 19, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
What are the implications for the ongoing challenges to international order and American security posed by states such as Iran and North Korea? How can states that egregiously violate international norms be reintegrated into the “family” or “community” of nations?
Webcast

Foreign Relations of the United States Series: Southern Africa, 1969-1976

September 14, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The Wilson Center's Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the Africa Program presents a panel discussion on the the newly released Foreign Relations of the United States, 1969–1976, Volume XXVIII, Southern Africa.
Webcast

Iran 1953 and the Uses of Middle East History

September 12, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Former New York Times Istanbul Bureau Chief Stephen Kinzer ties together the events of the 1953 Iranian Coup, the evolution of present-day Iran and Turkey and the upheaval of today's "Arab Spring."
Webcast

Book Launch – Playing with Fire: Pakistan at War with Itself

September 07, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Asia Program
Washington Post correspondent Pamela Constable weighs in on why Pakistan cannot curb the appeal of radical Islam.

Homero Campa Butron on “Tres Episodios en Una Relación Tri-Lateral”

August 25, 2011 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Mexico Institute
The absence of diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States has made Mexico a frequent intermediary when controversies arise between the two nations. At the same time, Mexico’s perceived closeness to the United States has, on occasion, unsettled the country’s historically warm relations with Havana, possibly compromising its position as an effective negotiator. Mexico, Cuba, and the United States have a “triangular” relationship, with Mexico frequently playing a fulcrum role that places it in the middle of important Cuba-U.S. issues, especially on migration, said Homero Campa Butrón, Public Policy Scholar In-Residence at the Woodrow Wilson Center.
Webcast
Podcast

Cuba's New Emerging Market Strategy: Has the United States Made Itself Irrelevant?

August 04, 2011 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Latin American Program
Critically, can a south-south emerging market strategy offer a new vision for the Cuban economy and pull it out of its low-investment, low-growth trap? And what does Cuba's south-south strategy mean for US policies toward Cuba?
Webcast

Arab Spring or Arab Winter (or Both)? Implications for U.S. Policy

July 19, 2011 // 9:30am11:00am
Middle East Program
Marwan Muasher, Ellen Laipson, Rami Khouri and Aaron David Miller discussed perspectives and policy implications of this year’s unrest in the Middle East, pointing out key observations and implications for the United States.
Webcast

Bullets to Books: The Role of Education in Development and What the U.S. Can Do

June 17, 2011 // 12:00pm1:15pm
Wilson Center on the Hill
Panelists discuss the importance of education from early childhood to higher education, its impact on a nation’s economy, and current education initiatives being put forth by USAID.

Africa: 53 Countries, One Union - The New Challenges

June 15, 2011 // 4:30pm6:30pm
Africa Program
Steve McDonald, Director of the Africa Program and Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity, Woodrow Wilson Center; Jessica Einhorn, Dean of SAIS, Johns Hopkins University; Romano Prodi, President, Foundation for World Wide Cooperation

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