U.S. Foreign Policy Events

Webcast

Defining American Priorities in the Middle East

November 20, 2012 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Middle East Program
From Iran to Syria, to an unresolved Israeli–Palestinian issue, the Obama administration faces some extraordinary challenges in the Middle East that are likely to make 2013 a critical year. How does the United States prioritize its objectives? Is it realistic to think about solutions to these problems, or are managed outcomes more relevant?
Webcast

Twenty Years of Independence: Reflections on Freedom and Democracy

November 16, 2012 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
This Director's Forum will feature Martin Bútora, Honorary President of the Institute for Public Affairs in Bratislava and former Ambassador of the Slovak Republic to the United States (1999-2003). Ambassador Bútora will deliver the keynote address at the 13th annual Czech and Slovak Freedom Lecture.
Podcast

A Conversation with Ambassador Edward Djerejian

November 15, 2012 // 8:45am10:00am
Middle East Program
Edward Djerejian, the former United States Ambassador to Syria and Israel, discusses recent developments in the Middle East after the Arab Spring.
Webcast

Radio Free Europe and the CIA Partnership

November 05, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty became successful substitutes for free media in the Soviet bloc during the Cold War. This seminar talk will draw on CIA and Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty archives to trace the history of their first two decades. It will address three questions: What was the evolving reason for CIA covert funding? What was the relationship between CIA and the Radios? Why did the Radios prove to be one of the most important and successful policy instruments of the United States during the Cold War?
Webcast

Cuban Missile Crisis: Nuclear Order of Battle

October 24, 2012 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
Robert S. Norris, senior fellow for nuclear policy at the Federation of American Scientists will lead a Wilson Center panel discussion on "Cuban Missile Crisis: The Nuclear Order of Battle." Joining him will be defense analyst and nuclear historian David A. Rosenberg. The event will take place during the 50th anniversary of the 13 day crisis.

Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis

October 23, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Cold War International History Project
The Cold War International History Project in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Historian presents a panel discussion, Foreign Relations of the United States and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

The Missing Link: How Can the Pakistani Diaspora Improve U.S.-Pakistan Ties?

October 02, 2012 // 11:00am12:30pm
Asia Program
A briefing on how the Pakistani diaspora can help enhance ties between Pakistanis and Americans.

Thirteen Days and More: A Soviet Perspective on the Cuban Missile Crisis

September 24, 2012 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Fifty years ago, the world spent thirteen days transfixed as the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. engaged in a contest of wills over placement of Soviet missiles in Cuba. Svetlana Savranskaya will discuss behind-the-scenes maneuvers by Soviet second-in-command Anastas Mikoyan, revealing that the crisis lasted into November and involved plans by the U.S.S.R. to leave tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba, foiled not by U.S. resolve, but by Fidel Castro’s own actions.

The Global Offensive: The United States, the Palestine Liberation Organization, and the Making of the Post-Cold War Order

September 24, 2012 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Cold War International History Project
In "The Global Offensive," historian Paul Thomas Chamberlin offers new insights into the rise of the Palestine Liberation Organization in its full international context.

Hanoi's War: An International History of the War for Peace in Vietnam

September 21, 2012 // 12:30pm2:00pm
Cold War International History Project
"Hanoi's War" takes the reader from the marshy swamps of the Mekong Delta to the bomb-saturated Red River Delta, from the corridors of power in Hanoi and Saigon to the Nixon White House, and from the peace negotiations in Paris to high-level meetings in Beijing and Moscow, all to reveal that peace never had a chance in Vietnam.

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