U.S. Politics Events

U.S. - African Trade: AGOA 11 Years Out, 4 to Go

November 30, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Africa Program
The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) became law in May, 2000. The Act offers tangible incentives (tariff exemptions, e.g.) for African countries to continue their efforts to open their economies and build free markets. AGOA, which has been amended three times, expires in 2015 and a key provision on fabric imports expires next year unless extended by Congress.
Webcast

Aiding Without Abetting

November 30, 2011 // 11:00am12:30pm
Asia Program
A new Wilson Center report calls for major changes to the U.S. civilian assistance program in Pakistan.
Webcast

Obama in Office: Assessing the First Two Years

November 29, 2011 // 4:00pm6:00pm
Congress Project
"Obama in Office" is a frank and objective assessment of Obama’s first two years as President as seen through the eyes of 18 of the country’s most astute scholars, journalists and practitioners. This book discussion, held on November 29, featured five of the chapter authors, including James Thurber, the book’s editor.
Webcast

The Americas and the World: Public Opinion and Foreign Policy in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, And Peru

November 29, 2011 // 2:30pm5:00pm
Mexico Institute
CIDE University in Mexico City, the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Latin American Program, the Inter-American Dialogue, the Latin American Initiative at the Brookings Institution, and the CSIS America’s Program were pleased to host the launch of the report on public opinion in the Americas.
Webcast

Reassessing Walter Lippmann

November 14, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Professor of International Relations Ronald Steel speaks about the career and legacy of renowned journalist Walter Lippman.
Webcast
Podcast

The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the South

November 07, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
History and Public Policy Program
Organized in collaboration with the History and Public Policy Program and the National History Center.
Webcast

Congress: Global Finance and Global Development

October 26, 2011 // 12:00pm1:15pm
Wilson Center on the Hill
The author of Legislating International Organization: The US Congress, the IMF, and the World Bank, will discuss how the U.S. Congress, tracing its long history of involvement with these institutions, wields significant influence. The impact of the 2008 financial crisis has focused American politics on the global role played by the IMF and World Bank.
Webcast

Changing Chinese Views of American Society

October 25, 2011 // 3:30pm5:30pm
United States Studies
Increasing numbers of Chinese travel to the US for business, tourism, or education, while others study American history and culture in local schools and universities. The Wilson Center was joined by experts from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences to discuss Chinese views of American society, politics, and culture.

Legislating International Organization: The US Congress, the IMF, and the World Bank

October 25, 2011 // 9:00am10:30am
Program on America and the Global Economy
Covering the history of the IMF and World Bank from their origins, Lavelle shows that domestic political constituencies in advanced industrial states have always been important drivers of international financial institution policy. She focuses in particular on the U.S. Congress, tracing its long history of involvement with these institutions and showing how the Congress wields significant influence. The impact of 2008 financial crisis has focused American politics on the global role played by the IMF and World Bank.
Webcast

Congress’ Influence on Foreign Policy: For Better or Worse?

October 17, 2011 // 4:00pm6:00pm
Congress Project
Congress does not pay close attention to foreign affairs; its oversight of the foreign policy establishment is sporadic and haphazard; and, when it does get involved, its decisions are usually driven more by politics than careful deliberation. That was the consensus of a panel convened at the Wilson Center Oct. 17 on the topic, “Congress’ Influence on Foreign Policy: For Better or Worse?”

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